Hyannis Harbor Cape Cod Fine Art Photography

Hyannis Harbor Cape Cod Massachusetts Photograph

Hyannis Harbor at sunset on a beautiful September evening showing the lighthouse and a fishing ship docked by fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding. Prints and framed art available for purchase.

Hyannis Harbor is a small natural harbor located in the village of Hyannis in the town of Barnstable, Massachusetts.  Hyannis Harbor is protected by a breakwater, is used as a harbor of refuge by coasting vessels and pleasure craft of less than 14-foot draft. A light is on the end of the breakwater. The harbor is the approach to Hyannis Port, on the west side of the harbor, Lewis Bay, and Hyannis at the head of the northwest arm of Lewis Bay.

The lighthouse is privately owned and is not open to the public. The best views are from the water or from nearby Keyes Beach.

Station established: 1849
Present tower built: 1849
Deactivated: 1929

Construction materials: Brick
Other buildings still standing: 1849 keeper’s house, 1902 oil house, cistern

Optic: Fifth-order Fresnel lens (1856)

About Hyannis:

Hyannis /ˌhˈænɪs/ is the largest of the seven villages in the town of Barnstable, Massachusetts, in the United States. It is the commercial and transportation hub of Cape Cod.

Hyannis is a major tourist destination and the primary ferry boat and general aviation link for passengers and freight to Nantucket Island.

Hyannis also provides secondary passenger access to the island of Martha’s Vineyard, with the primary passenger access to Martha’s Vineyard being located in Woods Hole, a village in the nearby town of Falmouth.

Due to its large natural harbor, Hyannis is the largest recreational boating and second largest commercial fishing port on Cape Cod, behind only Provincetown.

https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/hyannis-harbor-cape-cod-massachusetts-edward-fielding.html  

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A look inside a traditional Icelandic Farmhouse

Inside a turf farm house in Iceland

How did those early Icelander’s survive and even farm in such a inhospitably terrain? Before modern geothermal heating, before modern insulation and construction techniques – how did those early farmers survive the brutal winds, snow, ice and cold of living near the arctic circle?   How did them manage to keep the livestock alive and tend to their daily needs of feeding and cleaning out the barn?

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Short supply of wood on the island of Iceland, crazy wind and freezing temperature lead to some creative thinking on the part of early Icelanders. Pitched roof houses build right into the land with turf roofs solved many problems of keeping out of the howling wind to keep things toasty and also so the whole house didn’t blow away.

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Roofs were lined with the only plentiful building material – turf or sod. Living sheets of grasses covered the roof. Volcanic rock provided the foundation and side walls.

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Inside was small and sparse.  Less room to heat and more body warmth to conserve.  Bedrooms often housed the entire extended family in wooden bunks with sides to keep the covers handy.

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One bedroom lead to another and downstairs often had passageways to the barn if the barn wasn’t in the basement.  Easy access to livestock during storms and the 24 hour days of darkness in winter.

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The technique of building with  durable, renewable, and widely available turf  first appeared with the arrival of Norse and British settlers during the 9th through 11th centuries at the height of the Viking Age in Europe.

Historic records suggest that up to 50 percent of Icelandic dwellings were partially comprised of turf until the late 19th century. As populations began to cluster in cities like Reykjavik, wood buildings replaced stone masonry and earthen architecture. After fires razed the city in 1915, concrete became the material of choice.  – National Geographic 

Some Icelandic Turf Houses You Can Visit

Icelandic Turf House, Selfoss
Glaumbær in North-Iceland
Museum at Árbær

Do not throw coins at Mother Nature

Do not throw coins in the geysers

At Iceland’s great geothermal natural attraction – Geysir and Strokkur, you are in for a treat as Strokkur erupts rather regularly.  Geysir on the other hand has stopped being regular due to earthquake activity or perhaps due to the construction hotel and tourist trap across the street. But no it’s not time to toss in some Exlax.

In fact don’t toss in anything!  Many a geological treasure has been ruined by people tossing in things or going for a scalding swim or crashing their drone into the geyser.

They even have an appropriately snarky sign telling people to stop being stupid and keep their money.  How is throwing your money away going to bring you anything but poverty anyway?

See the entire portfolio of fine art photographs from Iceland here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/places+iceland

A remote chair among the lave fields of Iceland.  Buy a print here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/take-a-seat-iceland-edward-fielding.html

Strokkur (Icelandic for “churn”) is a fountain geyser located in a geothermal area beside the Hvítá River in Iceland in the southwest part of the country, east of Reykjavík. It is one of Iceland’s most famous geysers,[1]erupting once every 6–10 minutes. Its usual height is 15–20 m, although it can sometimes erupt up to 40 m high.

Geysir (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈgeːisɪr̥]), sometimes known as The Great Geysir, is a geyser in southwestern Iceland. It was the first geyser described in a printed source and the first known to modern Europeans.[citation needed] The English word geyser (a periodically spouting hot spring) derives from Geysir. The name Geysir itself is derived from the Icelandic verb geysa, “to gush”, the verb from Old Norse. Geysir lies in the Haukadalur valley on the slopes of Laugarfjall hill, which is also the home to Strokkur geyser about 50 metres south.

Eruptions at Geysir can hurl boiling water up to 70 metres in the air. However, eruptions may be infrequent, and have in the past stopped altogether for years at a time.

 

 

 

Pizza Menu Florence Italy

Best pizza in Florence Italy

Savor the pizza in Florence Italy!

Any trip to Italy is just as much about the food as it is about seeing Renaissance masterpieces by the likes of Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo the true poster children for the “Renaissance man”.

Painters, sculptures, inventors – these guys could do it all and still have time for a pizza at the end of the day.  Of course is also the ancient rubble left by the Romans, discarded, looted, recycled and buried under centuries of trash.

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Roman statues with missing arms and noses.  And renaissance era copies of said statues which were in fact mainly copies of the Greek statues that came before anyway.  Classical wonders through the ages, centuries and mood swings of the art patrons, all best viewed on a full stomach of great pizza.

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The history of pizza begins in antiquity, when various ancient cultures produced flatbreads with toppings.

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The precursor of pizza was probably the focaccia, a flat bread known to the Romans as panis focacius,[1] to which toppings were then added.[2] Modern pizza developed in Naples, when tomato was added to the focaccia in the late 18th century.

REMEMBER:  NO PIZZA BEFORE 9PM

One rule in Italy is no pizza for lunch.  Pizza in Italy is a social event and it is best eaten piping hot right out of the oven (preferably wood set and reaching  485º C) by a real chef preferably from Naples.

It takes a long time to get that wood fired pizza oven up to optimal temperature so thus, pizza as a late night snack, never for lunch.

Mangiare la pizza prima delle nove mi fa tristeza”  “To eat pizza before 9 pm makes me sad.”

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This is such a different concept than pizza in America where too often we stuff ourselves with terrible take out pizza, or school lunch pizza (think prison food) or those terrible excuses for pizza the frozen card board variety found in the freezer section at the supermarket.

Pirate Treasure Cave Pa’iloa Beach

Pirate Treasure Cave Pa'iloa Beach

Pa’iloa Beach Maui, Hawaii – On the “Road to Hana” there is a special black sand beach called Pa’iloa Beach, and unimaginable beautiful beach with walls of cliffs on two sides and a deep channel leading to a small, deep, beautiful rocky beach of lava rocks and these secret lava tube tunnels.

Hiking trails border the cliffs on both sides leading to incredible views of the beach, the rock formations and of course the amazing ocean waves.

Part of Wai’anapanapa State Park, the beach is the  most immediately noticeable feature to the 120-acres that make up Wai’anapanapa State Park. The translation for Wai’anapanapa is “glistening water” or “water flashing rainbow hues”, both of which are accurate in describing the powerful contrast between the black, pebble lava field and the deep blue-greens of the ocean.

Pa’iloa Beach is small with a ocean cave on the east side that can be traveled through to the ocean. There’s also a naturally made lava arch in the water.


A collection of fine art photographs made by Hawaiian born photographer Edward M. Fielding is available as fine art prints for framing at home, framed prints, metal prints, canvas prints, acrylic prints as well as on products such as tote bags and throw pillows.  The entire collection can be found here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/hawaii

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More articles on Hawaii –

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

Fine Art Photographs of Maui Hawaii

About the Road to Hana on the Hawaiian Island of Maui:  The Hāna Highway is a 64.4-mile long stretch of Hawaii Routes 36 and 360 which connects Kahului with the town of Hāna in east Maui. On the east after Kalepa Bridge, the highway continues to Kīpahulu as Hawaii Route 31.

The twisty road often has a posted speed limit of 10 miles an hour as it’s multitude of one line bridges create the need for careful driving.  Along the way you’ll find beaches, waterfalls,  hikes, jungle, scenic overlooks and pure adventure.

Behind the Shot: Elvis Presley Impersonator Las Vegas Nevada

Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley Lives On in Las Vegas

#Elvis #LasVegas

A few years back my wife attended a conference in Las Vegas and I went along to photograph Sin City. One thing I can tell you is nothing is open before 10 am and The Strip is very, very long in 105 degree heat. I walked all the way from Mandalay Bay to the Stratosphere, avoiding all of the money sucking vacuums along the way except spending $5 on this Elvis impersonator who must have been dying inside this suit. https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/…/elvis-presley-edward-f…

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Designed by hotel architect Veldon Simpson and interior designer Charles Silverman,[23] the Luxor has received recognition as being among the most recognizable hotels on the strip because of its unique design.

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Away from the glamour of the high concept hotels on the main part of the Las Vegas strip, the edges contain remnants of an older, sleazier Las Vegas, awaiting the next building boom and the wreck ball. Until then, they offer cut-rate rates for the low income traveler looking to roll the dice in Las Vegas.

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A unique photograph of the Bellagio Conservatory and Botanical gardens. One of the staff members directed me to this viewpoint where my fish eye lens was able to capture the granduer of the impressive space.

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Some of the classic Las Vegas neon signs still exist. Other are found in the Neon Graveyard or in downtown Las Vegas.

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Most of the gaming that goes on in Las Vegas is considered games of chance or luck with a hefty cut for the house. Poker is a family of gambling card games, but is often considered a skill based game. All poker variants involve betting as an intrinsic part of play, and determine the winner of each hand according to the combinations of players’ cards, at least some of which remain hidden until the end of the hand.

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Lots of money flows in and out of the casinos of Las Vegas. Most people leave with lighter wallets of course, but the casinos do require a lot of smaller bills to exchange for those $100 bills the customers arrive with.

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Why travel the world when this adult playground has done its best to bring all of the world’s most iconic sites to the desert?

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See more Las Vegas fine art photography here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/las+vegas

Autumn in New Hampshire

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Autumn in New Hampshire – They say here in New Hampshire there are four seasons stick season when the trees have no leaves, mud when you are waiting for the leaves to pop out, green summer and the color explosion of fall.

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Out of 52 weeks in the year, the autumn season comes down to perhaps three weeks when the foliage is peaking in various regions of the state and you have to time your capture time just right. Wait too long and a hurricane or tropical depression like Irene will roar up the coast and strip off the leaves. And perhaps take out a few roads, bridges and houses.

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Many people book trips to the state for the long Columbus day weekend. Usually there are a lot of activities and festivals going on around Columbus day and you’ll see a lot of bus tour activity – but often these tours miss the peak by a whole week.

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Peaks start in the colder areas, up north and in higher elevations. So if you plan your trip with this in mind and start north and meander south, you’ll be able to maximize your views of the incredible display from Mother Nature.

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Crisp fall days in the mountains and valley’s of New Hampshire can be exhilarating and one of the best times of year to go hiking as its not too hot. Wear layers as the shorter days will start out chilly but as you start hiking along or take in a local agricultural fair, the sun will begin to warm the land and you’ll be striping down to a t-shirt. Only to start to get cold a few hours later when the sun begins to dip on the horizon.

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New Hampshire’s climate from NewHampshire.com:

The Granite State is known for its highly changeable climate where the weather can be warm and sunny one minute and cold and snowy the next. Each of the four seasons vary greatly in their daily temperatures and weather patterns. Climate variations are also due to distance from the ocean, mountains, lakes or rivers. Spring arrives mid March and with it the most unpredictable weather patterns of the year. It’s been known to snow well into April when the flowers are just starting to bloom. The wacky weather patterns of Spring are replaced mid-June by the warm, sunny days and cool, clear nights of Summer. Starting in late September to early October, the landscape becomes ablaze with color and the evening temperatures start dipping below freezing. The days, however, are usually fairly sunny and mild. Winter begins in late October with the first dusting of snow and continues through March, with the last snow usually falling in April.

Iceland: Single White Chair In the Middle of a Black Lava Flow

Single White Chair – An Unexpected Treasure in the Middle of Nowhere
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Take a seat and relax, you are in the middle of nowhere in Iceland!

Every great adventure brings unexpected discoveries.  Our 11 day trek around Iceland via the Ring Road in a motor-home was just one such epic adventure full of unexpected discoveries like this single white wooden chair with hearts carved in it in the middle of a vast valley of black lava.

This day began as one of the most hellish days we experienced in Iceland.  We knew it was going to be our longest day of driving but we didn’t expect the fog and driving rain was going to wipe out just about all of our planned scenic stops and coastal views.  Or the scary drive over a mountain top, in the pouring rain and fog with a motor-home on a section gravel road over said mountain that pretends to be the main highway of a modern European country.

The one way bridges and one way tunnels and scarce guard rails we could handle but a pot hole, muddy road over a mountain pass with a motor home was a bit much.

Thankfully near the end of the long day of driving we came upon this amazing valley of mountains and black lava fields.  Some one was kind enough to provide this wonderful single white wooden chair as foreground subject.

One can only image hiking across this vast landscape of nothing but sharp, unstable, black lava rock without a tree as far as the eye can see and coming across this bit of humanity.  A single white chair providing a spot to rest.

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Icelandic artist Aðalheiður S. Eysteinsdóttir
….

You can see more fine art prints from my journey around Iceland and the Ring Road here: https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/places+iceland

Also available as t-shirts, greeting cards, prints, canvas, photogaphs, metal, acrylic, framed art and more. – www.edwardfielding.com

Iceland: Visiting a Plane Wreck on the Beach

Plane Wreck : Becoming one of Iceland’s most popular attractions, especially among photographers and selfie snappers is the wreck of a DC-3 airplane on a remote black sand lava beach in Southern Iceland.

DC 3 Plane Crash in Iceland
DC 3 Plane Crash in Iceland by Edward M. Fielding – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/plane-crash-iceland-edward-fielding.html

On Saturday Nov 24, 1973, a United States Navy Douglas Super DC-3 airplane was forced to land on Sólheimasandur’s black sand beach due to running out of fuel (others say it was after experiencing some severe icing).  Luckily all survived the rough landing on the south coast of Iceland.

 

Today, 44 years later only the main fuselage and part of the wings remain on the beach.  Other parts were hauled away years ago but the skeleton of the plane was left to slowly rot on the volcanic beach.

Years ago you could drive to the wreckage site via a “farm” road through the black ash but increased usage ticked off the land owner because of people constantly getting stuck, lead to the closure of the road.  For a while the land owner was charging people to park in a small parking lot and walk to the wreck.

After researching the location, I was prepared to have to skip this place thinking we would not be able to park our motor home.  But I visited in 2017 and am happy to report that the is a new spacious parking lot complete with room for large vehicles and campers as well as a bike rental place for faster travel to the site.

We visited in July.  The site itself is a long, dull walk down the relatively flat, straight road of crushed lava gravel.  It takes about 40 minutes to an hour of walking to get to the site so be prepared to spend some time.  Forty minutes to, 30 minutes waiting for your change at a shot and 40 minutes back, so bring some water, good shoes and an extra layer in case the weather turns.  The distance is approximately 4 km to the crash site.

Turnoff GPS Coordinates

63.4912391,-19.3632810

Airplane GPS Coordinates

63.459523,-19.364618

Be prepared for lots of people at the site depending on the time of day and time of year.  If you are patient, people come in waves.  If you are lucky to get there when there are only a few people, work fast and play with angles to get shots without people.  If there are a ton of people, relax and wait them out.  While we were there a ATV tour group showed up with orange jumpsuits.  They climbed all over the wreck and even stomped on it.  Makes me wonder if the days of the crashed plane are numbered with this abuse.

Many will say that the site is not worth the walk and one should spend time looking at natural sites.  As a photographer I can tell you it was certainly worthwhile visiting this unique site, I could careless about the effort need to get there.  If anything my eyes were numb with the natural beauty of the country, a bit of mysterious, man-made structure was a breath of fresh air.

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See more Iceland fine art photographs by Edward M. Fielding here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/places+iceland

Extra Credit:

Did you know Justin Bieber skateboarded on top of this plane carcass?

Justin Bieber skateboarding a plane in Iceland.
Justin Bieber skateboarding a plane in Iceland.

Bieber’s music video for his surprise track “I’ll Show You” features Iceland and Bieber doing all kinds of dangerous stuff like swimming with icebergs, rolling around in moss, sitting on cliffs and jumping around wet and slippery waterfalls.

Iceland: Fine Art Photographs

Iceland Photographs

Photographs of Iceland by fine art photographer, Edward M. Fielding

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This black church sits alone among a field of lava rock. On the south coast of Iceland’s Snæfellsnes peninsula, the tiny black church Búðir sits within the Búðahraun lava field.

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An old vintage tractor along the Ring Road in Iceland.

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The Skógafoss is one of the biggest waterfalls in the country with a width of 15 metres (49 feet) and a drop of 60 m (200 ft). Due to the amount of spray the waterfall consistently produces, a single or double rainbow is normally visible on sunny days. According to legend, the first Viking settler in the area, Þrasi Þórólfsson, buried a treasure in a cave behind the waterfall. The legend continues that locals found the chest years later, but were only able to grasp the ring on the side of the chest before it disappeared again. The ring was allegedly given to the local church. The old church door ring is now in a museum, though whether it gives any credence to the folklore is debatable.

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Kirkjufell (Icelandic: Church mountain) is a 463m[1] high mountain on the north coast of Iceland’s Snæfellsnes peninsula, near the town of Grundarfjörður.

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A cliff side cafe on the Snæfellsnes peninsula in Iceland.

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A rocky beach on the Snæfellsnes peninsula of Iceland with an emergency lifeguard hut and glacier in the background.

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Early morning light on a church in a remote area of Iceland on the Snæfellsnes peninsula.

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Kerið (occasionally Anglicized as Kerith or Kerid) is a volcanic crater lake located in the Grímsnes area in south Iceland, on the popular tourist route known as the Golden Circle. It is one of several crater lakes in the area, known as Iceland’s Western Volcanic Zone, which includes the Reykjanes peninsula and the Langjökull Glacier, created as the land moved over a localized hotspot, but it is the one that has the most visually recognizable caldera still intact. The caldera, like the other volcanic rock in the area, is composed of a red (rather than black) volcanic rock. The caldera itself is approximately 55 m (180 ft) deep, 170 m (560 ft) wide, and 270 m (890 ft) across. Kerið’s caldera is one of the three most recognizable volcanic craters because at approximately 3,000 years old, it is only half the age of most of the surrounding volcanic features. The other two are Seyðishólar and Kerhóll.

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See more at:  https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/places+iceland