Nubble Lighthouse York Maine, photography mecca

Nubble Light Cape Neddick Lighthouse

Nubble Lighhouse, York Maine – an iconic New England Landmark

Officially named the Cape Neddick Light,  Nubble Light is no doubt one of the most photographed American iconic locations in all of New England. Picture perfect Cape Neddick in York Maine hosts one of the most picturesque lighthouses in the country and includes a convenient parking lot and adjacent Lobster Shack for handy lobster rolls while you gaze across the inlet at the classic Maine lighthouse and its many out buildings, white picket fence and jagged granite cliffs.

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More lighthouse photographs and artwork here

 How to get there:

Accessibility: Follow Nubble Road east from Route 1A (Long Beach Ave.) in York, near Long Sands Beach, for about 1 mile to Sohier Park. Click here for more detailed directions. There is free parking at Sohier Park with an excellent view of the lighthouse. The lighthouse and grounds are not open to the public.

About

Compact park offering scenic views of historic lighthouse plus scuba diving, fishing & gift shop.
Sohier Park Rd, York, ME 03909
Hours:  Open today · Open 24 hours

Stats

  • Station established: 1879
  • Present lighthouse built: 1879
  • Automated: 1987
  • Construction materials: Cast iron lined with brick
  • Height of tower: 41 feet
  • Height of focal plane: 88 feet
  • Original optic: Fourth-order Fresnel lens (1879)
  • Present optic: Fourth-order Fresnel lens (1928)

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Brief History From Wikipedia:

The Cape Neddick Light is a lighthouse in Cape Neddick, York, Maine. In 1874 Congress appropriated $15,000 to build a light station at the “Nubble” and in 1879 construction began. Cape Neddick Light Station was dedicated by the U.S. Lighthouse Service and put into use in 1879. It is still in use today.

Plans had been in the works to build a lighthouse on the site since 1837. The tower is lined with brick and sheathed with cast iron. It stands 41 feet (12 m) tall but the light is 88 feet (27 m) above sea level because of the additional height of the steep rocky islet on which it sits. Unusually, the stanchions of the walkway railing around the lantern room are decorated with 4-inch (100 mm) brass replicas of the lighthouse itself.

Nubble Light is a famous American icon and a classic example of a lighthouse. The Voyager spacecraft, which carries photographs of Earth’s most prominent man-made structures and natural features, should it fall into the hands of intelligent extraterrestrials, includes a photo of Nubble Light with images of the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal.

Cape Neddick Light is one of the last eight lights in Maine to still have its Fresnel lens. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Cape Neddick Light Station on April 16, 1985, reference number 85000844.

The lighthouse and island were featured in the movie “Lost Boundaries” (1949) starring Mel Ferrer.

More lighthouse photographs and artwork here

10 Reasons to Tour Iceland Via Camper Van

RV rental in Iceland

Nothing beats the flexibility of camping when it comes to exploring Iceland. Why choose a camper van in Iceland?  Here are some great reasons:

  1. Save money.  Campsites are cheaper than hotels and you don’t have to rent a car.
  2. Flexibility. Hotels and Bed and Breakfasts on Iceland are few and far between.
  3. Unpredictable weather.  By camping you can change your schedule with the changes in weather.
  4. In a camper van you can go anywhere and do anything you want to do.
    There are 3 persons per square kilometer in Iceland. This allows you to basically disappear into the nature in a motor-home, caravan or camper van.
  5. No reservations needed. In Iceland you won’t need to reserve a spot at a camp site . You need simply to show up and enjoy it. Camp sites are very modern and have good facilities.
  6. Easy to get around. All of Iceland’s ring road (road no.1) is asphalt which allows you to drive safely around Iceland in any type of camper van.
  7. No planning needed.  You just follow the good weather and enjoy where it takes you.
  8. Great views from any parking spot. In Iceland there are hardly any trees. Therefore you always have an amazing 360° view from a camper at all times.
  9. Bring your kitchen with you. With a Camper van you have a kitchen wher-ever you go. This will save you lot´s of cash. Fast food in Iceland is expensive.
  10. Unpack once.  Instead of having to pack and unpack every day, with a camper you can unpack once.
Small camper vans are perfect for couples. Certainly beats setting up a tent every night. Compact but weather proof!
Camper rentals in Iceland can be tiny i.e. cooking outside to full sized RVs. Smaller campers are easier to drive and are cheaper but have some drawbacks regarding space.
Larger RV type campers are available with luxuries such as bathrooms and more space for larger families. Just be sure to read the rental agreement! Most don’t allow you to go on unpaved roads!

Train to the Top of Mount Cadillac in Acadia National Park?

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Perspective map not drawn to scale. Bird’s-eye-view. LC Panoramic maps (2nd ed.). Bar Harbor, Maine

Original lithograph was drawn, ca. 1886, Charles Jorgensen

Notice the hotel on the top of Cadillac Mountain. Today there is only a gift shop and bathroom facility.

Also interesting to note the cog railroad leading up to the top of Cadillac Mountain. This train was later sold and moved to Mount Washington in the White Mountains of New Hampshire were it is still in service today.

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The Green Mountain Cog Railway was a mountain railway built to carry tourists to the top of Green Mountain (now known as Cadillac Mountain) on Mount Desert Island in Maine. Its track was built to 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge, which is technically a narrow gauge, as it is a  1⁄2-inch less than 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge.

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At the end of the 19th century, Maine’s tourist industry was developing rapidly. The islands off the coast of Maine were popular attractions, and the possibility of a cog railway to the top of Green Mountain was first explored in the late 1870s, following the success of the Mount Washington Cog Railway in New Hampshire. Construction of the railway started in 1883, and it was built to the designs in the Marsh patents developed for the Mount Washington line. The first locomotive was built by the Manchester Locomotive Works, and was meant to be for the Mount Washington line. After the first season, Frank Clergue, “owner and operator”, bought another coach and locomotive, both identical to their predecessors. The coaches and work cars were built by the Hinckley & Egery Iron Co. The coaches had eight benches, with open air seating that could hold six. During bad weather, canvas tarps were rolled down from the ceiling to protect the passengers from the wind and rain. The #1 locomotive was named “Mount Desert”, and #2 was not named. Both locomotives were used at the same time when there were large numbers of passengers. There were no switches on the railway, so the trains did not have the ability to pass each other.

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The line operated during the summer season and for the first few years was successful. But tourist numbers declined, and after the 1890 season the railway ceased operations. The railway’s two steam locomotives were sold to the Mount Washington Cog Railway in 1895 after five years of disuse.

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Love of Photography or Love of Being on Vacation?

I think there is some confusion out there in photography land.  There is a true love of photography and then there is a “love of being on vacation with a camera”.

 Photography Prints

A true love of photography is the deep need to document the world around you.  This when you never leave the house without a camera, you are always taking photos and looking around for photo subjects non-stop.

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Then there is the pull the camera out of the closet, dust it off, perhaps buy a new lens because finally it is vacation time again!

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You can tell this type of photographer in online forums as they are the ones arguing about the latest cameras and which lens is the sharpest.  They are also the ones asking for photo spot suggestions and where they should go on vacation – Cuba? Iceland? Ireland? Which national park is the best? etc.  In otherwords, where can I justify pulling out the tripod and standing next to my fellow vacationers to get that same photo I see on the post card rack.

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Nothing wrong with this of course, I do it myself.  I get pumped for a vacation with the family and think about all of the great shots I’ll get while the family impatiently waits so we can go to dinner.

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Every new location brings a fresh scenes to captivate the imagination and a change of scenery recharges the soul.  Plus its good for the brain to have to plan out your adventure and navigate a new landscape.  Often one is restricted to basic equipment so planning and adaptation is required.

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But the true artist can bring out amazing images from their own backyard. The amateur puts full faith in the exotic location in order to impress.  As if their vision lays within their equipment and relies on the landscape to provide the artistry.

Photography Prints

Perhaps if the amateur didn’t put the camera back in the closet after an exotic vacation they would learn to see the wonders all around them in their own backyard.

 

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii
Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

If you are in the need of a fence, why not use local materials?  And if you live in Hawaii those local materials might just be discarded surfboards.  Surfboards have a life span and eventually end up in the landfills of Hawaii, but certain imaginative individuals have pressed new life out of these old surfboards by using them as a bright and colorful fence.

See all of the surfboard fence photographs and artwork from Hawaii here:  http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/surf

 

Winter Trip to the Cilleyville Bridge

Here in New Hampshire we recently experienced two blizzards within days with a bit more snow in the forecast. We had more snow this week then we’ve had in two years! So I’m feeling a bit of pressure to get out and photograph it.

The tricking part is finding the time between A. Being ordered by the Governor to stay off the roads unless its an emergency B. Shoveling out the driveway and C. Simply timing the weather.

Yesterday was 18 hours of snowfall, yesterday clouding and digging out but today was a great sunny winter day with temps in the mid-twenties which is down right balmy if you are well dressed. I decide to take a trip to a small covered bridge in Andover, NH called the Cilleyville Bridge. It always has a big American flag hanging on it so I knew that would look great against the snow. Here is what it looks like in the summer months:

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According to the local historians, the structure was built by a local carpenter by the name of Print Atwood. He was assisted by Al Emerson and Charles Wilson. Local folklore suggests that during construction, Emerson and Wilson became upset and cut some of the timbers short, causing the bridge to tilt. On the other hand, engineers might suggest that the tilt is caused by the very nature of the Town lattice truss design.

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The bridge was the last covered, and probably the shortest built in Andover. It was bypassed in 1959 and restricted to foot traffic. Located in the Cilleyville section of Andover, it was originally known as Bog Bridge. A Cilleyville Bridge was nearby, spanning the Blackwater river.

After it was torn down in 1908, the original Bog Bridge became known as the Cilleyville Bridge. The roof was reshingled in 1962 at a cost of $600. On March 9, 1982 the roof caved in from excessive snow load. The town repaired it in July 1982 for $3,400. The bridge was the model for the Shattuck murals of typical New Hampshire scenes which were once located in the State House in Concord. The Cilleyville Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Photography Prints

It was a great day out.  The sun warmed up the roads and melted the snow and ice so the drive over the foothills of the White Mountains on 4A was pleasant and I stopped along the way to photograph around the Shaker Village in Enfield.

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The only problem I ran into was that the snow was so high it kept getting into my 10-year-old Sorrel tall winter boots. I had to reach into my boots and pull out handfuls of snow from time to time which soaked my jeans. But at least it pushed me over the edge as far as buying a new pair of boots which I’ve been putting off. The heels on my old boots were basically gone and there were slashes in the sides. What I liked about the Sorrels was they were easy to slip in and out of and I could use them with snow shoes. What I didn’t like was the laces which never stayed tied and eventually I just removed.

I ordered a new pair of these boots from Kamik which are similar but don’t have any annoying laces. Kamik is a Canadian brand and if its anything the Canadian’s know about, its cold and snow. My son has had a pair of these for a few years and likes them.

 

More Covered Bridges: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/covered+bridge

Yes, You Will Get Naked in Iceland

There are a few things to know about Iceland.  One is its damn cold — of course.  But the other is that they have an abundance of geothermal heated and glacier melt clean water.

This has created a society that loves to swim and bathe as a social activity.  Pools and hot springs dot the island in every town.

For the weary traveler these public pools and hot springs provide a welcomed relaxing spot for tired hiking legs and for those camping around the island, they provide a great spot to get cleaned up in the showers.

For a few bucks you can take advantage of the showers, the pool and in some cases a water slide or two.

But be prepared for a cleaning regiment that might not be the norm back home.  The shower areas are typically separated by sex but open with everyone naked and washing up.  No time for modesty although Icelanders are known to hold a conversation or two in the showers.  A handy sign reminds visitors to be sure to clean those areas prone to dirt.

A reminder to get all of the dirty parts clean before entering the Icelandic pools.
A reminder to get all of the dirty parts clean before entering the Icelandic pools.

I remember getting a bit creeped out by that naked guy who would hang out in the Bar Harbor YMCA, shaving at the sink, towel free and buck naked.  That’s a bit much but in Iceland its expected that everyone have a thorough washing before entering the pool and its just a societal norm.  So just go with the flow, get in the swim and wash up those toes, pits, crotch and head.  Just remember to put your bathing suit on afterwards because suits are required out in the public area.


Read more about the cleaning regiment in this excellent blog post – http://www.gabriellemotola.com/blog/2014/12/11/welcome-to-iceland-well-get-you-naked

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The most famous pool is “The Blue Lagoon” which is a short 50 minute bus ride from from the capital city of Reykjavík or roughly a 21-minute drive from the airport.  Even if you only have a few hours in Reykjavik, you can make a visit.

The Blue Lagoon geothermal spa is one of the most visited attractions in Iceland. The spa is located in a lava field in Grindavík on the Reykjanes Peninsula, southwestern Iceland.

The Blue Lagoon is a man-made lagoon which is fed by the water output of the nearby geothermal power plant and is renewed every two days.

One important note about the Blue Lagoon.  Its popular, so they have a timed ticketing system.  Don’t wait until the last minute to get a ticket.  Call a few days in advance to make sure you can get in.

The Blue Lagoon

Feeling Brave as a Viking in Iceland

Would You Eat This?

What swims in the ocean, is poisonous when fresh, provokes a gag reflex to novice eaters, smells like cleaning products, is dried for four months and served on the end of the toothpick?

Kæstur hákarl is readily available in Icelandic stores and is eaten year-round
Kæstur hákarl is readily available in Icelandic stores and is eaten year-round

“the single worst, most disgusting  and terrible tasting thing” – Chef Anthony Bourdain

Why its the Icelandic delicacy Hákarl of course! Fermented and dried Greenland shark that inedible and actually poisonous when fresh due to a high concentration of urea and trimethylamine oxide.

The traditional method is by gutting and beheading a Greenland or sleeper shark and placing it in a shallow hole dug in gravelly sand, with the now cleaned cavity resting on a small mound of sand. The shark is then covered with sand and gravel, and stones are placed on top of the sand in order to press the shark. In this way the fluids are pressed out of the body.

After six to 12 weeks of fermenting and curing, the shark is then cut into strips and hung to dry for several months to dry.  During this time  a brown crust develops, which is removed prior to cutting the shark into small chunks.

Hákarl Icelandic Shark Meat delicacy
Hákarl Icelandic Shark Meat delicacy

First-timers are advised to pinch their nose while taking the first bite, as the smell is much stronger than the taste. It is often eaten with a shot of  local liquor called brennivín which is a form of akvavit.

Kæstur hákarl is readily available in Icelandic stores and is eaten year-round, grab some when you visit Iceland if you are feeling as brave as a Viking!

 

Scenes from Around the Upper Valley

Upper Valley Travels

Scenes from Around the Upper Valley

A short movie with scenes from my travels around the Upper Valley region of Vermont and New Hampshire.

New Hampshire and Vermont’s Upper Valley is surrounded by the Green Mountains of Vermont and the White Mountains of New Hampshire and consists of many small, wonderful towns and cities.  Home to DHMC and Dartmouth College, the ninth oldest college in the country and proudly serving the Ivy League community, Hanover New Hampshire offers the hustle and bustle of an upscale-casual city with a small town feel.

The region along the Connecticut river upstream and downstream from Lebanon, New Hampshire and White River Junction, Vermont, is known locally as the “Upper Valley”. The exact definition of the region varies, but it generally is considered to extend south to Windsor, Vermont, and Cornish, New Hampshire, and north to Bradford, Vermont, and Piermont, New Hampshire.

To buy prints, framed artwork, canvas prints, metal, prints as well as products such as tote bags, cell phone cases, throw pillows and more with photographs from the Upper Valley, visit: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/

Old Train Bridge
Old Train Bridge http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/2-old-steel-train-bridge-edward-fielding.html
Red Door Winter Barn, Windsor, Vermont
Red Door Winter Barn, Windsor, Vermont
Dartmouth College in Hanvover, NH framed art.
Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH framed art.
Ely Vermont Old Wooden Silo And Barn Black And White Framed Print
Ely Vermont Old Wooden Silo And Barn Black And White Framed Print
Inside The Horse Barn Black And White
Inside The Horse Barn Black And White
Edward Fielding

Edward Fielding

Etna, NH

NOTE: The watermark DOES NOT appear on the final print.
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I use my photography to communicate my vision of the world. My work deals with storytelling in light and shadow from the beauty, texture and shape of every day objects to wonders of the natural world. — Edward M. Fielding

Edward M. Fielding
Fine Art Photography
www.edwardfielding.com

Fine art photography and digital art by artist Edward M. Fielding. Fielding is an artist working in the photography and digital media. As a freelance artist my work is currently represented by several leading stock agencies.

My work has appeared in featured in numerous magazines, greeting cards, advertising, book covers and media companies as well as been widely shown and juries into fine art shows.

Recently I was one of the featured artists in the PhotoReel art show at Gallery W at the Whitney in the Berkshires.

In addition to fine art photography, I enjoy being a staff educator at the AVA Gallery and Arts Center in Lebanon, NH teaching creative technology such as Scratch and Lego Mindstorms robotics to elementary and middle school children.

Many of the images featured here on Fine Art America are available for rights managed licensing for book covers and other projects from Arc Angel Images – http://tinyurl.com/aww2wzl
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All work in this gallery is the original work of Edward M. Fielding. It is for sale, copyrighted to Edward M. Fielding and, as such, is protected by US and International Copyright laws.

Copyright Edward Fielding All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE:
Edward Fielding retains all rights to these images. It is illegal to copy, scan or duplicate from the website in any form.
Images on this site may not be used for personal or commercial use without written permission by Edward Fielding.

Photography Journey to the Arctic Circle

Planning for a trip to Iceland

We’re planning for a summer trip to the land of Fire and Ice.  Also the land of trolls, volcanoes, glaciers, best hot dogs in the world and fermented shark’s head.

What we know

  • Flights to Iceland are very inexpensive.  Many people take advantage of the no up charge, up to seven day, stop over on the way to Europe via Icelandic Air.
  • Food is very expensive just like Alaska or Hawaii or other remote areas.  Eating out is pricey so plan to make your own meals to save some dough.
  • Its cold!  Pack warmly as Iceland is cold, windy and rainy most of the time.
  • The majority of Iceland is not populated. Mostly the coastline is habitable.  You won’t have any trouble finding some peace and quiet.
  • Renting a camper van is a great way to see Iceland – this is what we will be doing.
  • Reykjavik is the capital and the largest city.  Lots of the natural wonders of Iceland can be seen within an 1 hour and a half drive or bus from the capital including the famous Blue Lagoon natural hot spring.
  • The Blue Lagoon requires reservations and tickets.
  • The country is 95% native Icelanders  and they speak Icelandic but most people also speak English at least in the more touristy areas.
  • The Ring Road or RT1 circumnavigates the entire island, its paved all the way but you will come across one way bridges.

Iceland from Ugmonk on Vimeo.

Tips from a friend who often goes camper vanning in Iceland:

  • You won’t get lost on the ring road.
  • Do your research beforehand so you have names and locations of campsites along the way. Many people speak English but not all.
  • Larger towns have grocery stores where you can pick up what you’ll need to cook at the campsite, otherwise, you go to the individual bakery and fruit market for your supplies. If you have dry snacks you like and want to bring, pack those. But pay attention to the weight of your bag.
  • We each had a large roller duffel and we packed sleeping bags as well.
  • When we rented our camper, we also rented the linen package that came with towels, blankets and pillows. Do that! Bring a few extra small (dark – just in case you want to use them to cover windows) towels in case your towels don’t dry.
  • Everything is expensive. Plan on it and forget about it.
  • We used credit cards everywhere though have CC cards with a chip and set up a pin because some places have that double security requirement.
  • The campsites we stayed at had hot showers and toilets. One had laundry but everything takes a long time to dry so I wouldn’t count on it. If you choose to do laundry at some point, find a laundromat in a larger town and use the hours to plan on bouncing around or doing something touristy. We didn’t do any laundry while camping.
  • Pack for all sorts of weather. The highest temps will be low 60s probably. Nights can get down to the low 40s.
  • Weather – You could have sun or rain or sleet or snow.
  • It’s wet – I had two pairs of sneakers in case one got wet and flip flops for showers and a nicer pair of flats to go out.
  • Gear – I basically packed all my athletic wear. Capris, leggings, skorts, tank tops, long sleeve wicking tops and heavier tops to layer. All manner of socks. Hats and mittens and four different weight jackets. The only thing I didn’t wear was the true fall weight jacket but we had spectacular weather and had it been any different I might have pulled that one out of the bag.
  • Bring bathing suits. There is a pool in every town, you can shower there and there are often hot springs.
  • Public pools have strict personal hygiene rules. Put away worries about dignity.  Rules of hygiene are taken very seriously with regard to the pools and all visitors are required to shower thoroughly without a swimsuit before entering the water.
  • Liquor – When you land in Reykjavik, there is a duty free shop at the baggage claim. Buy some stuff there (aka liquor).  Hard liquor is not sold outside of bars.  There are a lot of weird alcohol laws – https://wowair.us/magazine/alcohol-in-iceland/  Basically if you are a heavy drinker, Iceland is probably not the place for you.
  • Icelandic candy is lovely!