Austin Corbin’s Covered Bridge

Corbin covered bridge was build over the Sugar River in Newport, New Hampshire to provide access to Austin Corbin II’s mansion just up the lane from the covered bridge.

Corbin Bridge
Corbin Bridge is a covered bridge in Newport, New Hampshire

Corbin was born in Newport in 1827 and attended a one-room schoolhouse. He put himself through Harvard Law School before heading to Iowa where he soon switched from law to more lucrative land speculation and banking.  Later he invested in railroads and made a fortune.

A self-made millionaire, and known as the “Father of the Banking Industry”, a robber baron of the gilded age, Corbin like many of his peers like to hunt and when his Long Island estate ran out of room for his collection of deer, elk, and antelope, Corbin decided to build his own wildlife preserve back in New Hampshire.

This was the industrial age when many New England farmers gave up their hard scrabble farms for a life of toil in the factories, farm land could be snatched up cheap and Corbin ended up buying two mountains full of property to house his private hunting grounds. By 1889 he had acquired between 265-373 deeds. The final cost of the land averaged $5 per acre. That same year, the preserve was registered with the State of New Hampshire as the Blue Mountain Forest Association, a limited membership proprietary hunting club.

Corbin Park American Bison or Buffalo herd
Corbin Park American Bison or Buffalo herd – Newport New Hampshire

The animals which would include deer, elk, wild boar and even a herd of American Bison (saved from the brink of extinction from over zealous buffalo hunters in the west) enclosed by a  36 miles long and 12 feet high, with three feet of underground fencing to keep the boar from tunneling out.  Keep in mind that this as a time of great deforesting of New England where just about every tree was chopped down to make why farms, sheep grazing, paper making and firewood.  Deer were nearly extinct in the region.  Hunting at this point was like the European model, only to be had in private reserves stocked by the wealthy landowners.  White tail deer, now common again in New Hampshire,  had to be imported from Canada.

The Corbin estate in Newport, NH
The Corbin estate in Newport, NH – After making his fortune, Corbin return to his boyhood home, ripped down the old place and built this modest little domicile and then proceeded to build his animal park.

Corbin Park is what the locals call it but the real name is Blue Mountain Forest Association and to this day it is a limited membership proprietary hunting club.   Officially it’s called the Blue Mountain Forest Association, but everybody who knows about it calls it Corbin Park.  It’s near the border with Vermont and it’s huge, though its exact size seems to be something of a mystery. Regardless, at somewhere between 24,000 and 26,000 acres this park is actually bigger than something like 60 percent of New Hampshire towns. Something to the order of 35 members pay big bucks to hunt exotic animals with in the parks 26 miles of chain link fence.

Corbin Park buffalo herd
Corbin’s bison herd in New Hampshire no less! Old postcard image.

The Corbin Covered Bridge is a wooden covered bridge over the North Branch of the Sugar River on Corbin Road, approximately 1 mile west of NH 10 in Newport in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, United States.

Corbin Covered Bridge Newport, New Hampshire
Corbin Covered Bridge Newport, New Hampshire
  • It is a Town lattice truss bridge
  • Originally built in 1845, destroyed by fire in 1993 and subsequently reconstructed
  • Consists of one span with a total length of 96 feet (29 m).
  • The total width of the bridge is 18 feet (5.5 m), and has a single lane road.
  • The bridge rests on stone abutments.
  • The bridge passes 12 feet (3.7 m) over the water. Its sides are sheathed, the usual means by which the truss elements are protected from the elements.
  • The bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976 but was removed when destroyed by fire.

 

Photography PrintsArt PrintsPhotography Prints

 

More information about Corbin can be found here:   http://eastmanliving.com/2011/11/corbin%E2%80%99s-%E2%80%9Canimal-garden%E2%80%9D/

Abandoned New Hampshire – Fine art photographs of the forgotten

Abandoned Factory in New Hampshire

Abandoned New Hampshire – All over New Hampshire are relics of the past. Forgotten and abandoned farm equipment, farms, house, barns, sugar shacks, outbuildings, outhouses, cars, cemeteries and sometimes even whole towns.

Left to decay and rot away. Sometimes its a new opportunity that causes people to leave it all behind. Other times is just the convenience, lack of zoning or the lack of the concept of a town landfill and recycling. Sometimes it is a death or a bankruptcy or a stock market downturn.

Redneck Landscaping
View out the back porch – Redneck Landscaping

See the Abandoned Collection here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/abandoned

 

The Abandoned Garage Full of Old Cars

Old abandoned car dealership in Weare New Hampshire
Old abandoned car dealership in Weare New Hampshire – fine art photograph by Edward M. Fielding

This relic from the past sits in front of an old Ford dealership in Weare, New Hampshire.

“I’ve been told the building you see there was built in 1930 and replaced one that burned down. The business was started by Maurice Grant in 1919 in an old grist mill. Later Maurice’s brother Leon took over the business and Maurice went on to become the owner of State Motors in Manchester…it was called “South Weare Garage”, the first Ford dealership in New Hampshire; this dealership was chartered by Henry Ford himself, who visited Weare on more than one occasion.”

The Former Woolen Factory

Fine art photography of an abandoned factory
The former Hartford Woolen Mill in Newport, New Hampshire by Edward M. Fielding

This abandoned former woolen mill is now serving as a canvas for the local rural New Hampshire aspiring graffiti artists.

Currently a brownsfield site being monitored by NH Environmental Services.  The 3.8-acre site is the location of an abandoned 19th century woolen mill building approximately 12,000 square feet in size. Several wooden roof beams of the former mill building have rotted, and the building is in a general state of disrepair. The site was most recently owned by the late Christi Ambargis. Ambargis acquired title to the property from the Hartford Woolen Company in January 1960. Ambargis held title to the property until his death in 1996, at which time the property passed to his wife. She renounced and
relinquished any ownership of the property due to considerable tax liens levied against it for non-payment of taxes, and potential liability for the clean-up and remediation of environmental contamination. In 2000, a tax deed certified the town as the site owner.

Ambargis reportedly collected used oil from various sources and stored the material at the site for intended use in a fuel-blending project.

Abandoned Truck in New Hampshire by Edward M. Fielding
Abandoned Truck in New Hampshire by Edward M. Fielding

Abandoned Train Bridge

Old Train Bridge Newport New Hampshire
Old Train Bridge Newport New Hampshire by Edward M. Fielding

When railroads go bankrupt, their track beds and bridges are usually forfeited and sit idle until the state decides that no new train is coming anytime soon and they are turned into multi-use trails for hiking, skiing, biking, ATVs and snowmobiling.

The old Concord to Claremont Line follows the Sugar River and has an impressive array of steel truss and wooden covered bridges along its section between Newport and Claremont.

The Concord and Claremont Railroad was an American railroad company during the mid-nineteenth century in New Hampshire spanning from Concord to Claremont.  Currently The Claremont and Concord Railroad now operates on a short line between Claremont Junction on the main line to Claremont. 9 miles (14 km) of the line between Claremont and Newport is now the Sugar River Recreational Rail Trail, owned and managed by the New Hampshire Division of Parks and Recreation.

Abandoned Farm Equipment

Abandoned farm equipment can be found all over New Hampshire, even in the middle of the woods with trees growing through them.  You look around at the forest and think, how the heck did this get here?  Yet in 40 or 50 years a cleared farm field can revert to forest erasing all traces of the farm save for the stone walls and rusty old farm equipment.

People salvage these old rusty plows and haying equipment for garden ornaments but it can be dangerous trying to pry some of this old stuff from the forest’s grip.  A few years back a guy trying to salvage some old equipment from the woods died.  He got cut in half when the equipment gave way  expectantly and his winch yanked part of a hay baler into his midsection.

Old Abandoned Tractor at Muster Field Farm
Old Abandoned Tractor at Muster Field Farm

Old barns, sheds, and sugar shacks are also commonly found all over rural New Hampshire.

Old Abandoned Shack by Edward M. Fielding
Old Abandoned Shack by Edward M. Fielding

Photography PrintsPhotography PrintsArt PrintsPhotography Prints

See the Abandoned Collection here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/abandoned


New Hampshire’s Sugar River Recreational Trail – Newport to Claremont

Old Train Bridge Newport New Hampshire

Sugar River – After moving from central Upper Valley to the Kearasge  Mountain region, just 15 minutes east on I89, a whole new region seems to have opened up to explore.  One of my finds has been the Sugar River Recreation trail which provides a great bike, snowmobile, hiking and ATV trail along an old railroad grade between the New Hampshire cities of Newport and Claremont.

Photography Prints

Last time I was there a team from the Library of Congress was on site documenting a historic steel truss bridge in Newport.  Unfortunately this typically means the bridge is in danger of being removed and indeed it had a bunch of safety cones on it.  The bridge in the above photo is in better shape and ran by the old Hartford Woolen Mill which is now in a state of total disarray and is currently a brownfield site being monitored for oil leakage as the last owner had been using it as a site to store used oil.

Sell Art OnlineSell Art Online

The Sugar River Recreational Trail, this picturesque 9.8-mile path stretches from Newport to the southeastern edge of Claremont along the banks of the Sugar River. This video shows some of the best parts of the trail, bridge crossings over the Sugar River and some time lapse footage of the beautiful fall scenery along the trail.

To reach Claremont proper, you can seamlessly connect to the Bobby Woodman Rail Trail, which meets the Sugar River Trail at Washington Street and heads toward the center of the city.

Photography Prints

The trail has nearly a dozen other bridges, ranging from small wooden plank structures to steel truss bridges that span the Sugar River and its side streams. If the trail inspires you to see more of the region, finish your day by hiking, fishing, boating, camping or just relaxing in one of two nearby state parks. The beach at Mt. Sunapee State Park is a great place for a swim after you get off of the trail, and you can take rented kayaks and canoes for a spin on Lake Sunapee.

Sugar River Trail - A multi-use trail from Newport to Claremont.
Sugar River Trail – A multi-use trail from Newport to Claremont. A former rail road grade that crosses the Sugar River with steel truss and wooden covered bridges.

 Sell Art OnlineSell Art Online


New Release! Red Chairs by the Lake

Red Chairs by the Pond by Edward M. Fielding

Red Chairs – A new fine art print by Edward M. Fielding (www.edwardfielding.com) is now available as a canvas print (shown above), museum quality prints, framed and matted in custom sizes and frame choices (100s available) as well as metal, wood, acrylic prints and on products.  Click here to order your print of Red Chairs

Sell Art Online

Perfect decor for your lake house, shot in New Hampshire but this relaxing image of two red chairs out by the lake is perfect for any lakeside home or simply for dreaming about sitting by the lake on a warm fall afternoon.

Anderson Pond is a small fifteen acre kettle pond within the residential development of Eastman in Grantham,Springfield and Enfield, New Hampshire. Eutrophic in
nature (fertile with abundant nutrients for plant production),
is becoming a little shallower as each year goes by. As silt builds
up on the bottom, a succession of plant life occurs called a
hydrosphere. What we see now are various water lilies and
pondweeds. As the water becomes even more shallow, reeds will
develop.

Spring brings a plethora of frog song from spring peepers,
bullfrogs, green frogs, leopard frogs and American toads. On
warmer days, painted and snapping turtles may be seen sunning
on the logs or a family of mergansers or mallards might occupy
the pond, sometimes joined by the great blue heron strutting
the shores on the lookout for fish.
Several species of fish inhabit the pond: perch, large and small
mouth bass and even a northern pike or two.

– excerpts from an article about Anderson Pond by Craig McArt and Renée Gustafson


New England Winter Scene with snow, red barn and vintage red tractor

Old tractor in the snow

Behind the Shot:  Classic New England Winter Scene

This is one of those photographs that has it all.  Snow, a great old red barn or more accurately, a maple syrup producing sugar shack and a great old red vintage tractor.

New England winter shots like these require a lot of planning.  Photographing winter in rural New Hampshire among the hills and dales, along the country lanes and over the forested mountains, can be a huge challenge in winter.

Most of the time there is no place to park.  Drainage ditches line the old country roads and snow plows are apt to come by at any moment to bury your car under a pile of slush and snow.

Best to plan ahead, keep track of points of interest that you wish to return to in winter, watch the weather reports and hope and pray that the farmer doesn’t move his old vintage tractor out of position.

These aren’t movie props ya know.  Farm equipment such as this great old red tractor are working essentials to the operation of these farms such as this one in Lyme, New Hampshire with its working maple syrup operation.

Sell Art Online

In winter farm equipment might used to move firewood or push snow out of the path to the barn. Although often an old tractor like this one, even if it is still working, is probably used mostly in the summer for hay cutting.

A few tips on photographing classic New England winter landscapes such as this:

  • Plan out your shot before walking around the scene.  You don’t want to create a bunch of ugly footprints in the snow.
  • Avoid bright sun.  Sunlight can be harsh in winter with glare reflecting off the snow.  Overcast days are great for reducing shadows and preventing highlights from creating overly contrasty scenes.
  • Meter for snow.  Don’t let your snow turn gray because you didn’t use exposure compensation.  Add a stop of exposure to make sure your snow isn’t dull and gray.
  • Keep certain locations in mind for future photo shoots in different seasons.  For example this old tractor and farm in Hopkinton, NH is on my list for a revisit once winter sets in.  I shot it in the fall, now for a winter version of this scene.

Sell Art Online

New England Winter Photographs by Edward M. Fielding

Art Prints

A horse and red barn in the middle of a snow storm in the Stowe and Waterbury area of Vermont.

Sell Art Online

The photogenic Jenne Farm in Vermont which as graced the cover of many a calendar.

Photography Prints

Trapp Family Lodge, stone chapel in the woods in Stowe, Vermont.

Sell Art Online

A scene from the secret cross country area in Lyme,  New Hampshire.  A former scout summer camp, now a warming hut for cross country skiers.

Art Prints
Hanover green in winter.  A snow covered green scene with bench on the Dartmouth College campus in downtown Hanover, New Hampshire.

All images are available as fine art prints, framed prints, canvas, metal prints and more.  https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/winter

Iconic Vermont Photographs by Edward M. Fielding For Sale

Blizzard at the red dairy barn.

Iconic Vermont Photographs

Decorating with local Vermont icons seems to be in mind for these recent collector from Randolph, Vermont.  The buyer selected a nice choice of Vermont seasonal landscape photographs from my collection.  I really enjoy seeing this collector curated selection from my portfolio of 100s of Vermont, New Hampshire and New England fine art photographs.  What a great eye this buyer has!

This collection of Vermont photographs reminds me of years it took to create this collection of iconic Vermont images and the individual effort to create each one.  Forget about pouring over maps and driving around to find these spot, I’m talking about putting my body and camera equipment at risk to get the shots.

Art Prints

I remember my feet slowly slipping across the wet, slimy rocks at this covered bridge and waterfall in Thetford, Vermont as I was lining up the shot.  I keep thinking, unless my boots grip something soon, I’m going over the falls.

Sell Art Online

This shot is just over the Connecticut River from Vermont in Etna, New Hampshire.  A big old red classic dairy farm with Dutch style room on a farm just outside of Hanover, NH and Lyme, NH.  A stones throw from Norwich, VT.  Well sane people were at home by the wood stove watching the weather reports, this guy was hiking over, dodging snow plows and then wading knee deep into the snow to compose the sticking image of a classic red New England barn against the snow covered landscape complete with billowing snow.  Thank goodness for my weatherized Canon 6D and a handy wipe to clean the lens.

Art Prints

The iconic old red mill in Jericho, Vermont is a bit of a trek to find but the danger involved in getting this shot involves a busy thoroughfare more than anything else.

Art Prints

This shot of a red barn in the late afternoon with the reflection off the Connecticut River involved a bit of maneuvering.  First spotted I had to find a place to park the car on busy Route 5 which follows along on the Vermont side of the Connecticut River.

The I had to hope the guardrail and disappear into the under brush while my wife worried about me back at the car.  To get into position for the reflection to look right I braved the tick infested vines, mud and the remnants of an old barbed wire fence.

Coming back up the bank I had to negotiate the slippy mud, thick underbrush and untangle the barbed wire from my leg before it dug in deep enough to require a tenus shot.

I’ve tried to return to this spot other years but never seem to have found the same area.  Might have been a lower water level that allowed me to get this great Vermont scene.  Just goes to show you,  take the shots when you see them.  You might not be back to the area or even be able to capture the same scene again.

The Barns of Vermont and New Hampshire

Family farms sporting traditional and historic wood framed New England barns and stables still dot the New England landscape in Vermont and New Hampshire.  The barns,  most painted bright red against the summer time green landscape, the brilliant orange, brown and red colors of autumn and the white snowy landscape of winter.  But you can find other colors such as white or “hasn’t been painted in decades” gray.

Photography Prints

A fine white barn in South Woodstock at the Green Mountain Horse Asssociation. Founded in 1926, GMHA is the nation’s oldest continuously operating horse association whose mission is to provide and maintain opportunities for educational and competitive activities for diverse equestrian disciplines. Emphasis is placed on equestrian trails preservation, horsemanship and youth education.

The facility, located in South Woodstock, Vermont, offers a wide range of events to hundreds of equestrians each year in dressage, driving, events, hunter/jumpers, and trail riding. GMHA is dedicated to preserving trails and open space for equestrian use, and the trail network covers over 400 miles.

The 65-acre facility includes stabling for 196 horses, four all-weather arenas with European Geo-Textile footing, a spectacular cross-country course, and driving hazards.

Photography Prints

In Enfield, New Hampshire right next door to the historic Shaker Village is a wildlife refuge and this building is part of the maintenance crew’s facilities.

Sell Art Online

One of the most photographed farm spots in Vermont if not the world.  When you think of Vermont, the image that enters your brain might just be Jenne Farm.

Jenne Farm is a farm located in Reading, Vermont. It is one of the most photographed farms in the world, especially in autumn. The farm has appeared in magazine covers, photography books, and a Budweiser television advertisement; it has also served as a setting in the films Forrest Gump and Funny Farm. Photographs of the farm have appeared on posters, postcards and wall calendars.

Despite its fame, the private farm is located along a dirt road and is not heavily promoted. The only sign indicating its presence is a tiny board along Vermont State Route 106 advertising maple syrup.

The farm became noted for photogenic scenery about 1955 when a photography school in South Woodstock discovered it. Later, it appeared as an entry in a Life photo contest, on the cover of Yankee magazine, and in Vermont Life.

Sell Art Online

Stowe, Vermont and Waterbury, Vermont have many old farms and old barns including this small horse barn on the way from the Ben and Jerry’s factory and on to the ski resort town of Stowe, Vermont.

Art Prints

This newer classic New England red barn in Etna, New Hampshire, part of Hanover, NH – home of Dartmouth College, beautifully sits on a hillside over looking the small village.

Sell Art Online

In the backroads of Vermont, far from the last waypoint on the map or GPS, wonderful old wooden barns in their unpainted beauty can be found among the brilliant fall foliage.

Photography Prints

A collection of old New England barn buildings with a single red door beyond.  This amazing complex of old barns is found right off the main road in Windsor, Vermont – the birthplace of the state.

Winter Trip to the Cilleyville Bridge

Here in New Hampshire we recently experienced two blizzards within days with a bit more snow in the forecast. We had more snow this week then we’ve had in two years! So I’m feeling a bit of pressure to get out and photograph it.

The tricking part is finding the time between A. Being ordered by the Governor to stay off the roads unless its an emergency B. Shoveling out the driveway and C. Simply timing the weather.

Yesterday was 18 hours of snowfall, yesterday clouding and digging out but today was a great sunny winter day with temps in the mid-twenties which is down right balmy if you are well dressed. I decide to take a trip to a small covered bridge in Andover, NH called the Cilleyville Bridge. It always has a big American flag hanging on it so I knew that would look great against the snow. Here is what it looks like in the summer months:

Photography Prints

According to the local historians, the structure was built by a local carpenter by the name of Print Atwood. He was assisted by Al Emerson and Charles Wilson. Local folklore suggests that during construction, Emerson and Wilson became upset and cut some of the timbers short, causing the bridge to tilt. On the other hand, engineers might suggest that the tilt is caused by the very nature of the Town lattice truss design.

Sell Art Online

The bridge was the last covered, and probably the shortest built in Andover. It was bypassed in 1959 and restricted to foot traffic. Located in the Cilleyville section of Andover, it was originally known as Bog Bridge. A Cilleyville Bridge was nearby, spanning the Blackwater river.

After it was torn down in 1908, the original Bog Bridge became known as the Cilleyville Bridge. The roof was reshingled in 1962 at a cost of $600. On March 9, 1982 the roof caved in from excessive snow load. The town repaired it in July 1982 for $3,400. The bridge was the model for the Shattuck murals of typical New Hampshire scenes which were once located in the State House in Concord. The Cilleyville Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

Photography Prints

It was a great day out.  The sun warmed up the roads and melted the snow and ice so the drive over the foothills of the White Mountains on 4A was pleasant and I stopped along the way to photograph around the Shaker Village in Enfield.

Art Prints

The only problem I ran into was that the snow was so high it kept getting into my 10-year-old Sorrel tall winter boots. I had to reach into my boots and pull out handfuls of snow from time to time which soaked my jeans. But at least it pushed me over the edge as far as buying a new pair of boots which I’ve been putting off. The heels on my old boots were basically gone and there were slashes in the sides. What I liked about the Sorrels was they were easy to slip in and out of and I could use them with snow shoes. What I didn’t like was the laces which never stayed tied and eventually I just removed.

I ordered a new pair of these boots from Kamik which are similar but don’t have any annoying laces. Kamik is a Canadian brand and if its anything the Canadian’s know about, its cold and snow. My son has had a pair of these for a few years and likes them.

 

More Covered Bridges: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/covered+bridge

Finally a great dump of snow! Nordic skiing in the Upper Valley

After the last couple of years of crummy snow conditions it was great getting trip of blizzards this week!

Some people are getting up tight about snow days and the high school year being extended but who cares? My son’s a senior, his graduation day is set in stone. Bring on the snow!

If you live down in Florida or some place where you don’t have snow, this next video will give you an idea of what you are missing. Sure the shoveling is tough but its good exercise.

During the blizzard I like to stay off the roads and let the snow plow crews do their work. Nothing is worse than having to pull cars out of banks and ditches when the drivers could have just stayed at home or maybe planned ahead for that gallon of milk they do desperately needed in the middle of a blizzard.

Photography Prints

Luckily in my neighborhood I have this great big old dairy barn to photograph. Its wooden red exterior looks great in the billowing snow storm.

Photography Prints

I hiked through the woods, across the road to get these shots of the old red barn in the peak of the onslaught of snow flurries. It was coming down at about two inches an hour at this point and the snow was sliding off the metal roof from the wind blasts.

Photography Prints

Getting up close to the barn took a bit of doing.  I had my knee high boots on but had to deal with an incredibly steep bank created by the plows and then walk through the layers of ice, six inches of crust and then the eight inches or so of powder snow.

In contrast here is what the scene looks like in the summer time.

Art Prints

Covered Bridges in the Upper Valley

Covered Bridges of New England

Another winter storm was in forecast  but the morning was sunny so I decided to take a ride to one of my favorite covered bridges to give you a look inside.

Covered bridge hunting is a fun thing to do in the Upper Valley of New Hampshire and Vermont along the Connecticut River, there is a great collection of historic, traditional wooden covered bridges still exist including the longest covered bride in the country.  Some are obvious while others are a bit hidden.

Moxley Covered Bridge
Moxley Covered Bridge – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/moxley-covered-bridge-chelsea-vermont-edward-fielding.html

Moxley Covered Bridge – The Moxley Covered Bridge in Chelsea, Vermont is a 59 foot long Queenpost Truss. It carries Moxley Road over the First Branch of the White River in Chelsea. This bridge was built in about 1883.

Taftsville Covered Bridge Vermont
Taftsville Covered Bridge Vermont – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/taftsville-covered-bridge-vermont-edward-fielding.html

The Taftsville Bridge is a two span 189 foot long Multiple Kingpost Truss with an arch. Spans are 89 and 100 feet. It carries River Road the over Ottaquechee River in Taftsville Vermont. This bridge was built in 1836 and is one of the oldest covered bridges in Vermont.

Blow-Me-Down Covered Bridge
Blow-Me-Down Covered Bridge, Cornish, New Hampshire – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/blow-me-down-covered-bridge-cornish-new-hampshire-edward-fielding.html

The Blow Me Down Bridge is a one span Multi-King post Truss with a total length of 85 feet. It carries Mill Road over Blow Me Down Brook in the town of Cornish. This bridge was built in 1877.

Cresson Covered Bridge Sawyer Crossing
Cresson Covered Bridge Sawyer Crossing – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/cresson-covered-bridge-sawyer-crossing-edward-fielding.html

The Sawyer Crossing or Cresson Bridge is a two span Town Lattice Truss with a total length of 159 feet. It carries Sawyer Crossing Road over the Ashuelot River in the town of Swanzey. This bridge was built in 1859.

Cornish Windsor Covered Bridge
Cornish Windsor Covered Bridge – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/cornish-windsor-covered-bridge-edward-fielding.html

The Cornish Windsor Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans the Connecticut River between Cornish, New Hampshire and Windsor, Vermont. It was the longest covered bridge still standing in the United States until the Smolen Gulf Bridge opened in Ohio in 2008 but the the Cornish-Windsor bridge still carries car traffic while the Ohio bridge is only pedestrian traffic. Mt. Ascutney can be seen in the background

More Covered Bridges in the Area

More fine art photographs of covered bridges from all over the Upper Valley and New England can be seen here – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/covered+bridge