Can you solve the mystery of at Saint-Gaudens Historic Site?

Mystery mold

 

More than a century ago, sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and his assistants to sealed shut roughly two dozen sculpture molds. The molds were put into storage for safekeeping.

Since then, the molds have passed from the Saint-Gaudens family to the non-profit Saint-Gaudens Memorial to the National Park Service. They also survived a catastrophic studio fire in 1944. Through the years, the identities of many of these sealed molds had been lost. Until now.

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The National Park Service at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish and the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock?s medical center in Lebanon have developed a partnership to non-invasively peek at what these molds contain.

With computed tomography (CT) scanning, normally used for creating an image of the inside of a patient?s body without surgical intervention, radiologists were able to scan the open interior spaces of these molds and then extrapolate the negative space into a positive digital image of what these molds would have been used to cast.

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They also took the additional step of converting these CT scans into stereo lithography which have been used to 3-D print casts of these original Saint-Gaudens works.

One of the scanned mold, after processing was found to be a Saint-Gaudens work previously unknown to art history. Park staff would love public assistance in trying to identify this individual.

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Woodstock Vermont Fine Art

Woodstock Vermont

WOODSTOCK VERMONT – I recently sold this watercolor technique fine art photograph of Woodstock, Vermont which was ordered in this handsome frame and mat combination and is headed to a collector in Knoxville, TN.

I offer many of my fine art photographs in this style of watercolor type brush strokes.  Over the years of processing my images I’ve developed this process that gives a painterly effect after a few hours of working on the image.

As always my images begin with a trip to the location.  In this case the quint and beautiful village of Woodstock, Vermont.

Woodstock has a lot of attractions for visitors including fine dining, golf and spa treatments at the famous Woodstock Inn, a covered bridge tucked into the small downtown full of little shops and restaurants and of course the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park and Billing farm attractions with a working farm, museums and historic home of the Rockerfellers who had a lot of influence over the town over the years.

Nearby is Quechee gorge as well as the ski area colorfully called Suicide Six.  Xcountry skiing is also available from the Woodstock Inn and nearby Mt. Tom which is connected to the National Historic Park.

The area is quite the tourist draw with the VINS bird rescue center over by Quechee, the glass blowing at Simon Pearce and the annual hot air baloon festival.

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The image above was taken right downtown, across from the Woodstock Inn, across from the town green and around the corner from one of the historic and well preserved homes in Woodstock. The covered bridge is drivable but it is off from the main street.

I used the white picket fence to create a leading line up to the covered bridge in the distance and of course waited for the tourists to leave the area.

Back in the studio I started my watercolor process that creates multiple layers of “brush stocks” using the original fine art photograph as the template. It’s takes several hours building up layers and matching colors to bring about the final result.

A look inside a traditional Icelandic Farmhouse

Inside a turf farm house in Iceland

How did those early Icelander’s survive and even farm in such a inhospitably terrain? Before modern geothermal heating, before modern insulation and construction techniques – how did those early farmers survive the brutal winds, snow, ice and cold of living near the arctic circle?   How did them manage to keep the livestock alive and tend to their daily needs of feeding and cleaning out the barn?

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Short supply of wood on the island of Iceland, crazy wind and freezing temperature lead to some creative thinking on the part of early Icelanders. Pitched roof houses build right into the land with turf roofs solved many problems of keeping out of the howling wind to keep things toasty and also so the whole house didn’t blow away.

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Roofs were lined with the only plentiful building material – turf or sod. Living sheets of grasses covered the roof. Volcanic rock provided the foundation and side walls.

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Inside was small and sparse.  Less room to heat and more body warmth to conserve.  Bedrooms often housed the entire extended family in wooden bunks with sides to keep the covers handy.

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One bedroom lead to another and downstairs often had passageways to the barn if the barn wasn’t in the basement.  Easy access to livestock during storms and the 24 hour days of darkness in winter.

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The technique of building with  durable, renewable, and widely available turf  first appeared with the arrival of Norse and British settlers during the 9th through 11th centuries at the height of the Viking Age in Europe.

Historic records suggest that up to 50 percent of Icelandic dwellings were partially comprised of turf until the late 19th century. As populations began to cluster in cities like Reykjavik, wood buildings replaced stone masonry and earthen architecture. After fires razed the city in 1915, concrete became the material of choice.  – National Geographic 

Some Icelandic Turf Houses You Can Visit

Icelandic Turf House, Selfoss
Glaumbær in North-Iceland
Museum at Árbær

Pirate Treasure Cave Pa’iloa Beach

Pirate Treasure Cave Pa'iloa Beach

Pa’iloa Beach Maui, Hawaii – On the “Road to Hana” there is a special black sand beach called Pa’iloa Beach, and unimaginable beautiful beach with walls of cliffs on two sides and a deep channel leading to a small, deep, beautiful rocky beach of lava rocks and these secret lava tube tunnels.

Hiking trails border the cliffs on both sides leading to incredible views of the beach, the rock formations and of course the amazing ocean waves.

Part of Wai’anapanapa State Park, the beach is the  most immediately noticeable feature to the 120-acres that make up Wai’anapanapa State Park. The translation for Wai’anapanapa is “glistening water” or “water flashing rainbow hues”, both of which are accurate in describing the powerful contrast between the black, pebble lava field and the deep blue-greens of the ocean.

Pa’iloa Beach is small with a ocean cave on the east side that can be traveled through to the ocean. There’s also a naturally made lava arch in the water.


A collection of fine art photographs made by Hawaiian born photographer Edward M. Fielding is available as fine art prints for framing at home, framed prints, metal prints, canvas prints, acrylic prints as well as on products such as tote bags and throw pillows.  The entire collection can be found here – https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/hawaii

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More articles on Hawaii –

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

Fine Art Photographs of Maui Hawaii

About the Road to Hana on the Hawaiian Island of Maui:  The Hāna Highway is a 64.4-mile long stretch of Hawaii Routes 36 and 360 which connects Kahului with the town of Hāna in east Maui. On the east after Kalepa Bridge, the highway continues to Kīpahulu as Hawaii Route 31.

The twisty road often has a posted speed limit of 10 miles an hour as it’s multitude of one line bridges create the need for careful driving.  Along the way you’ll find beaches, waterfalls,  hikes, jungle, scenic overlooks and pure adventure.

Autumn in New Hampshire

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Autumn in New Hampshire – They say here in New Hampshire there are four seasons stick season when the trees have no leaves, mud when you are waiting for the leaves to pop out, green summer and the color explosion of fall.

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Out of 52 weeks in the year, the autumn season comes down to perhaps three weeks when the foliage is peaking in various regions of the state and you have to time your capture time just right. Wait too long and a hurricane or tropical depression like Irene will roar up the coast and strip off the leaves. And perhaps take out a few roads, bridges and houses.

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Many people book trips to the state for the long Columbus day weekend. Usually there are a lot of activities and festivals going on around Columbus day and you’ll see a lot of bus tour activity – but often these tours miss the peak by a whole week.

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Peaks start in the colder areas, up north and in higher elevations. So if you plan your trip with this in mind and start north and meander south, you’ll be able to maximize your views of the incredible display from Mother Nature.

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Crisp fall days in the mountains and valley’s of New Hampshire can be exhilarating and one of the best times of year to go hiking as its not too hot. Wear layers as the shorter days will start out chilly but as you start hiking along or take in a local agricultural fair, the sun will begin to warm the land and you’ll be striping down to a t-shirt. Only to start to get cold a few hours later when the sun begins to dip on the horizon.

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New Hampshire’s climate from NewHampshire.com:

The Granite State is known for its highly changeable climate where the weather can be warm and sunny one minute and cold and snowy the next. Each of the four seasons vary greatly in their daily temperatures and weather patterns. Climate variations are also due to distance from the ocean, mountains, lakes or rivers. Spring arrives mid March and with it the most unpredictable weather patterns of the year. It’s been known to snow well into April when the flowers are just starting to bloom. The wacky weather patterns of Spring are replaced mid-June by the warm, sunny days and cool, clear nights of Summer. Starting in late September to early October, the landscape becomes ablaze with color and the evening temperatures start dipping below freezing. The days, however, are usually fairly sunny and mild. Winter begins in late October with the first dusting of snow and continues through March, with the last snow usually falling in April.

Touring the Icebergs in Iceland

With a name like Iceland, you expect to see some ice right?  Well you will.  Ice cold glacier water, glaciers and best of all flowing icebergs.  The best place to see icebergs up close and personal like is at Jökulsárlón which is a lagoon that fills up with small icebergs that break off the glacier and float out to sea.

Amphibious “duck boat” type tours are available in Iceland.

But before the icebergs melt away, they gather and float in and out of the lagoon.  They even end up landing on the black sand beach where you can watch them melt, flip, and beach themselves before they disappear. Seals are also often seen playing in this lagoon.

All in all the area is a mesmerizing place to view the ice, photograph the ice or take part in any or all of the tour operations that operate here including kayak and paddle board rentals and these amphibious vehicles that drive like a car and the plunge into the water.

Jökulsárlón is a glacial lagoon, bordering Vatnajökull National Park in southeastern Iceland. Its still, blue waters are dotted with icebergs from the surrounding Breiðamerkurjökull Glacier, part of larger Vatnajökull Glacier. The lagoon flows through a short waterway into the Atlantic Ocean, leaving chunks of ice on a black sand beach. In winter, the fish-filled lagoon hosts hundreds of seals.

 

 

Nubble Lighthouse York Maine, photography mecca

Nubble Light Cape Neddick Lighthouse

Nubble Lighhouse, York Maine – an iconic New England Landmark

Officially named the Cape Neddick Light,  Nubble Light is no doubt one of the most photographed American iconic locations in all of New England. Picture perfect Cape Neddick in York Maine hosts one of the most picturesque lighthouses in the country and includes a convenient parking lot and adjacent Lobster Shack for handy lobster rolls while you gaze across the inlet at the classic Maine lighthouse and its many out buildings, white picket fence and jagged granite cliffs.

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More lighthouse photographs and artwork here

 How to get there:

Accessibility: Follow Nubble Road east from Route 1A (Long Beach Ave.) in York, near Long Sands Beach, for about 1 mile to Sohier Park. Click here for more detailed directions. There is free parking at Sohier Park with an excellent view of the lighthouse. The lighthouse and grounds are not open to the public.

About

Compact park offering scenic views of historic lighthouse plus scuba diving, fishing & gift shop.
Sohier Park Rd, York, ME 03909
Hours:  Open today · Open 24 hours

Stats

  • Station established: 1879
  • Present lighthouse built: 1879
  • Automated: 1987
  • Construction materials: Cast iron lined with brick
  • Height of tower: 41 feet
  • Height of focal plane: 88 feet
  • Original optic: Fourth-order Fresnel lens (1879)
  • Present optic: Fourth-order Fresnel lens (1928)

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Brief History From Wikipedia:

The Cape Neddick Light is a lighthouse in Cape Neddick, York, Maine. In 1874 Congress appropriated $15,000 to build a light station at the “Nubble” and in 1879 construction began. Cape Neddick Light Station was dedicated by the U.S. Lighthouse Service and put into use in 1879. It is still in use today.

Plans had been in the works to build a lighthouse on the site since 1837. The tower is lined with brick and sheathed with cast iron. It stands 41 feet (12 m) tall but the light is 88 feet (27 m) above sea level because of the additional height of the steep rocky islet on which it sits. Unusually, the stanchions of the walkway railing around the lantern room are decorated with 4-inch (100 mm) brass replicas of the lighthouse itself.

Nubble Light is a famous American icon and a classic example of a lighthouse. The Voyager spacecraft, which carries photographs of Earth’s most prominent man-made structures and natural features, should it fall into the hands of intelligent extraterrestrials, includes a photo of Nubble Light with images of the Great Wall of China and the Taj Mahal.

Cape Neddick Light is one of the last eight lights in Maine to still have its Fresnel lens. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places as Cape Neddick Light Station on April 16, 1985, reference number 85000844.

The lighthouse and island were featured in the movie “Lost Boundaries” (1949) starring Mel Ferrer.

More lighthouse photographs and artwork here

Train to the Top of Mount Cadillac in Acadia National Park?

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Perspective map not drawn to scale. Bird’s-eye-view. LC Panoramic maps (2nd ed.). Bar Harbor, Maine

Original lithograph was drawn, ca. 1886, Charles Jorgensen

Notice the hotel on the top of Cadillac Mountain. Today there is only a gift shop and bathroom facility.

Also interesting to note the cog railroad leading up to the top of Cadillac Mountain. This train was later sold and moved to Mount Washington in the White Mountains of New Hampshire were it is still in service today.

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The Green Mountain Cog Railway was a mountain railway built to carry tourists to the top of Green Mountain (now known as Cadillac Mountain) on Mount Desert Island in Maine. Its track was built to 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge, which is technically a narrow gauge, as it is a  1⁄2-inch less than 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge.

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At the end of the 19th century, Maine’s tourist industry was developing rapidly. The islands off the coast of Maine were popular attractions, and the possibility of a cog railway to the top of Green Mountain was first explored in the late 1870s, following the success of the Mount Washington Cog Railway in New Hampshire. Construction of the railway started in 1883, and it was built to the designs in the Marsh patents developed for the Mount Washington line. The first locomotive was built by the Manchester Locomotive Works, and was meant to be for the Mount Washington line. After the first season, Frank Clergue, “owner and operator”, bought another coach and locomotive, both identical to their predecessors. The coaches and work cars were built by the Hinckley & Egery Iron Co. The coaches had eight benches, with open air seating that could hold six. During bad weather, canvas tarps were rolled down from the ceiling to protect the passengers from the wind and rain. The #1 locomotive was named “Mount Desert”, and #2 was not named. Both locomotives were used at the same time when there were large numbers of passengers. There were no switches on the railway, so the trains did not have the ability to pass each other.

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The line operated during the summer season and for the first few years was successful. But tourist numbers declined, and after the 1890 season the railway ceased operations. The railway’s two steam locomotives were sold to the Mount Washington Cog Railway in 1895 after five years of disuse.

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Love of Photography or Love of Being on Vacation?

I think there is some confusion out there in photography land.  There is a true love of photography and then there is a “love of being on vacation with a camera”.

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A true love of photography is the deep need to document the world around you.  This when you never leave the house without a camera, you are always taking photos and looking around for photo subjects non-stop.

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Then there is the pull the camera out of the closet, dust it off, perhaps buy a new lens because finally it is vacation time again!

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You can tell this type of photographer in online forums as they are the ones arguing about the latest cameras and which lens is the sharpest.  They are also the ones asking for photo spot suggestions and where they should go on vacation – Cuba? Iceland? Ireland? Which national park is the best? etc.  In otherwords, where can I justify pulling out the tripod and standing next to my fellow vacationers to get that same photo I see on the post card rack.

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Nothing wrong with this of course, I do it myself.  I get pumped for a vacation with the family and think about all of the great shots I’ll get while the family impatiently waits so we can go to dinner.

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Every new location brings a fresh scenes to captivate the imagination and a change of scenery recharges the soul.  Plus its good for the brain to have to plan out your adventure and navigate a new landscape.  Often one is restricted to basic equipment so planning and adaptation is required.

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But the true artist can bring out amazing images from their own backyard. The amateur puts full faith in the exotic location in order to impress.  As if their vision lays within their equipment and relies on the landscape to provide the artistry.

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Perhaps if the amateur didn’t put the camera back in the closet after an exotic vacation they would learn to see the wonders all around them in their own backyard.

 

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii
Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

Surf Board Fence Maui Hawaii

If you are in the need of a fence, why not use local materials?  And if you live in Hawaii those local materials might just be discarded surfboards.  Surfboards have a life span and eventually end up in the landfills of Hawaii, but certain imaginative individuals have pressed new life out of these old surfboards by using them as a bright and colorful fence.

See all of the surfboard fence photographs and artwork from Hawaii here:  http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/surf