Stock Photography Reality Check Part One

So you think you might like to dabble in stock photography?  Here is a bit of a reality check to keep your expectation in line with reality.

What is stock photography?

Stock photography is the solution to expensive custom photo shoots.  Not every commercial photo use such as a magazine advertisement,   online ad,  local ad circular, small business business card etc. has the budget for a full on custom photo shoot.

Brand name fashion ads in Vanity Fair and Vogue, yes, but not Joe the Plumber’s ad in the yellow pages.  So stock photography provides a library of already made photographs for designers to use.  They might not get exactly what they want but it will be close enough.   Also what they get won’t be exclusive but their lower budget clients will have to deal the very real possibility that other pizza joints will use the same shot of a steaming hot slice of pizza.

In the old days, stock photographs were on slides and the stock agency would do a search for their clients and show they possible images on slides.  They would also publish stock books showing the images available.  All the images were provided by professional photographers.

Then came the internet, cheap, unlimited storage and access to photographers of all walks of life.  This allowed the stock libraries to expand and to accept images from professionals and amateurs alike.  These new stock providers were dubed “microstock” because the economics of lots of images procured inexpensively allowed them to offer the images to their clients for less then stock images previously cost.

Will I make a zillion dollars selling stock?

The microstock industry has matured to the point where there are millions and millions of images available for licensing.  In the very early days, one could up load a crummy photo and it would sell over and over.

Now a days your images are in competition with millions of other images.  The reality of today’s microstock market, is that you can see a few sales here and there but you can’t expect to give up your day job for microstock.

Are there more sellers or buyers?

The reality is that there are zillions more images available to license then the buyers will ever need.   Just like most things on the Internet – eBay, the fine art photography market, people trying to sell used Ikea Lack coffee tables on Craigs list – there are far more sellers than buyers.

How many images do I need in my microstock portfolio before I start seeing sales?

When I first started selling some of my work as stock, I figured I’d upload 40 or so images and I’d be soon laying on the beach watching my bank account fill up.  Then the reality struck and I realized I’d have to become an image factory if I was going to sell anything.  It was around 400 stock images in my portfolio before I started to see steady sales.

But you can’t stop there.  You have to continually feed the beast just to keep your head above water.  Images flood into the stock agencies every day, you need to provide fresh inventory to your portfolio just to be notices.

It’s gotten to the point where the stock agencies play games like rotating the contributors in the search.  They want to keep the good contributors interested so they try to make sure everyone gets a sale once in a while to hold their interest.

What are the best selling stock images?

The best selling stock images are the ones that are the most costly to procure.  Custom photo shoots with models cost a lot of money but at the same time in the advertising world, photographs with people are the most valuable – images with people are the most sought after.

Every amateur photographer wants to shoot landscapes, flowers or birds so of course the stock agencies are saturated with these images.  If you want to stand out, shoot people or other hard to obtain subjects.

You also want to create images with copy space so designers can add text.  A good way to learn about what types of images make good stock can be found in these books:

What is your value proposition?

As an Artist Your Value Proposition Separates Your Work from the Crowd

What is it about your work that makes it deserve a sale? Think about the last time you purchased or supported another artist’s work. Why did you do it? How did it make you feel?  What was the value of the purchase to you?

Consider that buying artwork is not like buying a commodity product like salt or gas.  Art is not purchased because it’s the lowest price or you had a coupon.

Sell Art Online

Out of the zillions of available art works and photographs on the market that you could purchase, for some reason this particular piece of artwork compelled you to love it and purchase it.

Some of the factors involved might be:

  • You met the artist face to face
  • You saw a documentary about the artist
  • You read an interesting article about the artist
  • The artwork provoked a strong memory
  • The artwork was the perfect size or color for a space in your home
  • A friend recommend this artist
  • The artist reminds you of a more famous artist that you can’t afford
  • The artwork created a gut reaction
  • The art makes you happy
  • The art makes you think
  • The art sets a mood
  • The art matches your decor
  • The art matches your theme
  • You like the artist positions
  • You like what the art has to say about the world
  • The art is modern, the art is retro
  • The art gives you a positive feeling

etc, etc, etc.

One thing to remember when selling art is people buy or support art for a very different set of reasons than anything else they spend money on.  Not only are they receiving a product for their money but they like to know they are supporting an artist so they can continue to create.

Art Prints

Support Artists To Support Your Set of Values

If you see work you like, you should support this work, even if you don’t end up owning it, because this artist is creating the kind of beauty you want to see in the world. By helping this artist survive and continue to make work, you’re helping someone change the world in the way you want it to change.

Sell Art Online

Your Value Proposition

Your value proposition as an artist sets you apart from your fellow artists and photographers.

VALUE PROPOSITION – (in marketing) an innovation, service, or feature intended to make a company or product attractive to customers.

In an never ending flood of amateur snapshots uploaded daily on social media, a professional level quality and execution.  Consistently, editing, selection and subject choice can be enough to pull your work out of the masses and into the realm of quality worth spending money.

Your followers will come to expect focused images with good composition, free of dust spots, grain and poles sticking out of people’s heads.

Sell Art Online

My value proposition as a fine art photographer would go something like this:

Using professional equipment, honed post-processing skills, years of study, effort and passion for my subjects, creativity and a unique vision, I offer a unique and compelling images suitable for display in the finest homes and offices.

Further my collectors come to appreciate my style of clean and uncluttered compositions.  They might also take comfort knowing that my work has been shown in galleries, on book covers and magazines around the world.

Art Prints

The fact that professional image buyers have selected my work to grace book covers and illustrate magazine articles doesn’t make someone love it, but it does provide affirmation that their choice is a solid one.  After all, if it’s good enough for a book publisher to bet the success of a book launch on, it’s probably good enough to grace a guest room.

Art Prints

See my portfolio at: https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/

 


Art Prints

Can you sell something you know nothing about?

Including your own art?

Imagine walking into a hardware store, finding a clerk and asking about hammers.

“For this job do I need a claw foot hammer, a roofing hammer or a electricians hammer?  Is a fiberglass handle better than wood? What the difference between this triangle head and this round one?”

And the clerk just stares at you blankly and says “Idonntknow”, shuggs his shoulder and goes on break.

Art Prints

To sell art you need to know at least as much as your customers know.  Is you knowledge of photography limited to knowing where to buy a camera?  If a potential customer ask you a question about your photography would you have an interesting response?

“What motivated you to take this image?”

“I don’t know.  I just was thinking it might be a good thing to take a picture of and everyone else was taking a picture of it.”

To be a credible artist, at least do some soul searching and be able to talk about your work enough that the potential buyer get the impression that you are seriously working on your art and craft.  Be prepared to answer questions like:

  • What style is your photography?
  • Who are your influences?
  • Which photographers do you like?
  • Do you know the history of photography as an art form?
  • What are you goals with your photography?
  • What are your passions?
  • What is the last photography monograph you purchase?
  • What is the last photography show you attended?
  • What do you want the view to feel when they look at your photography?

Sell Art Online

Selling Art and Photography requires thinking like a buyer

Do you consume art and photography like you expect your buyers to?  Do you purchase original art?  Do you follow great photographers on social media?  Do you read about compelling photographers?  Do you visit galleries and museums to see what is going on in the world of photography and art?
Photography Prints

To ask a buyer or collector to purchase your artwork, you have to provide more of a reason than “here is a image – buy it” – you need to think and act like a buyer.  Think and act like a participant in the world of art and photography, not just like a stock boy putting another can of soup on the shelf.



 

Fine Art America and Pixels Unofficial FAQ Answers

As a successful, long time artist selling on Fine Art America and Pixels, I get asked a lot of basic questions about the format and set up of an account on the POD site.  I’ve covered basic art selling tips and strategies in other blog posts, and talked about what Print On Demand or POD is all about, so in this blog post I’m just going to concentrate on the basic mechanics and questions about the Fine Art America and Pixels sites.

 

BEHIND THE SCENES

Behind The Scenes is where you can control your sellers account on FAA an Pixels.  It contains your account information, public profile, marketing, stats, sales data, sale balance, pricing, etc.

To find your own “behind the scenes” first log in to your account and then hover over your name in the upper right.  A drop down menu will appear and “behind the scenes” will be the second choice.  Click on that and you’ll have access to all of the behind the scenes setting to set up your account.

Spend a lot of time in Behind The Scenes and you’ll discover all you need to know about offering your work for sale on FAA and Pixels.

PRICING

In the real world art pricing is based on an individual artists reputation, skill, past history, career point, show history etc.   While many POD sites treat all artists the same and have fixed profit margins (typically low), FAA and Pixels allows the individual artist to set their own profit margin.

This allows a more established artist to sell at higher prices or perhaps allows for a strategy of volume selling with a lower profit margin — in any case the pricing strategy is left to the individual artist.

FAA and Pixels are a middle man between the artist and the various vendors that they use to fulfill the orders.  The vendor (the one who actually prints the t-shirt, mug, or art print) gets a cut of the overall price and FAA/Pixels takes their cut for processing the orders and running the website.  Then there is the artist’s cut which you determine.  Will it be $5 or $500 for a 20×20 inch canvas print?

In the “behind the scenes” area you will have to put in your profit margin that will be added to the vendor cut and FAA/Pixels cut to determine the final price to the buyer.

You can add profit margins for any print size as well as for products such as mugs and phone cases.  This is the amount you will receive if the item sells.

Photography Prints

Tips

  • If you don’t want to sell a particular print size or a certain product – leave the box completely blank.  Don’t put in a “0”.  A zero means that it can still sell and you will receive nothing.
  • Don’t follow the suggested prices from management.  They are very low and you can do better.
  • You can price individual images each time or set up “Default Prices” in “Behind the Scenes”
  • You can change your prices universally using “Default Prices” and then applying the new prices to some or all of your images.

Art Prints

PREMIUM ACCOUNT

Is it worthwhile to pay $30 a month for a Premium Account on Fine Art America and Pixels?  Yes – if you are serious about running a business selling your artwork on Fine Art America and Pixels.  You can set up a free account to test out the system and upload 25 images.  A free account is great for seeing how everything works and getting your profile ready, but don’t expect to sell anything.  25 images is a drop in the bucket to the thousands of new images that get uploaded every day on these sites.

The chances of some buyer finding your images with only 25 is like a needle in a haystack.  Consider that you will be in this for the long haul and it might take many months if not years to start selling your work.  It takes time for your promotional efforts to pay off.

So any way, consider the $30 a cost of doing business that will most likely be paid off with a sale or two if you market your work.

Photography Prints

Pixels vs. Fine Art America

Pixels and FAA look awfully similar don’t they?  Except for a few logo differences and colors they are virtually the same site although Pixels has more of the product stuff such as mugs and t-shirts whereas Fine Art America sticks to the more traditional art offerings such as canvas prints and framed art.  But its the same company, same artists for the most part and same vendors fulfilling the orders.

If you sign up to sell your work with one of them, you will be on the other one too.  All of the “behind the scenes” stuff is shared.  Make a change to a price or upload a new image on one site and it changes on the other on too.

Why do I get so many visitors from the same cities?

If you watch the visitor count in “Behind The Scenes” you see your images being visited by the same cities over and over. Especially if you promote your images on social media such as Twitter. Instantly after Tweeting you’ll see 20 or so hits from these cities.

Are these real people looking at your work? Most likely not. Most of the views are from search engine bots that constantly scan the web for new content and uses these software bots to analysis and index web pages and images. Most of what you see recorded in “behind the scenes” will be these software robots or “bots”. To get real people to see your work you have to stop wasting time looking at “views” and get out there and actively promote and market your artwork. Don’t worry about view counts, worry about attracting buyers. It only takes one view from an active buyer to make a sale or you can get thousands of bot views and not sell.

How and when will I be paid?

If you are fortunate enough to make a sale, you will receive notification via email.  You can also check sales in “behind the scenes” under “sales” or under “balance”.  Payments are made each month on the 15th via PayPal.  But you won’t be paid right away.  FAA/PIxels has a 30 day money back guarantee so you have to wait for that period to end.   It could be up to two months before you are paid depending on when the order comes in.  And the buyer could cancel to order, have used a bad credit card or returned the item.  So basically don’t count your chickens until they are in your PayPal account.  Fortunately returns are rare but they do happen and they stink!

Sell More Art – Understanding Buyer Motivation

Modern Farm House Style Decor https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/farm
Modern Farm House Style Decor
https://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/farm

Recently on the Fine Art America artist forums a member was talking about setting up an art auction site. Other members had a lot of questions about establishing trust, curating the art, and other concerns. Things provided by well established art auction houses.

The “entrepreneur” brushed off these concerns saying “we are the sellers here, not the buyers.”

Sorry folks but if you don’t understand the motivations of the buyer, you are not going to do much selling.

Train photography by Edward M. Fielding
Train photography by Edward M. Fielding http://www.edwardfielding.com

Motivations of the Seller

As an art seller it doesn’t take too much soul searching to understand why you want to sell our art. There are several reasons. The major one being money. You need money to pay for equipment, supplies, food, rent, models, studios space, gas, trips to the dentist etc. Everyone needs money for their time and effort.

The other motivation is a personal satisfaction of knowing that someone else appreciates the work you are producing. Other motivations include career advancement, prestige, reputation, fame, branding and other achievements. But all in all its rather straightforward. You are producing a creative product and need to find buyers who will support your ongoing efforts.

Motivations of the Buyer

Motivations of the buyer can range from wanting to cover a crack on the wall to wanting to make a financial investment. The motivations determine if someone buys art on sale at Walmart, buys from an artist at an art fair or buys at a high end aution and stores the art in a bunker for ten years.

If your method of selling does not match the motivations of the buyer, you are probably not going to sell much art or photography. Let’s some reasons people might want to buy art.

  • They need a gift for a wedding, graduation, birthday, housewarming etc.
  • They want to decorate a room.
  • They want something cheery to greet them in the morning.  Something uplifting that will make them laugh or smile.
  • Something that will remind them of something – a trip, a place, a time, a location.
  • To impress.  They want to impress their friends and co-workers with their good taste.  The art enhances the owners self-esteem or self-perceptions of its owners.
  • To collect.  They enjoy collecting art of a certain genre or theme.
  • To inspire.  They want art or photography that will inspire their own work.
  • To think.  They want art that will make them think and question.
  • To relax.  They want art that is calming or relaxing to look at.
  • As an investment.  They want to park their money somewhere and hope it appreciates.
  • Price.  The art was a good deal or it was in their budget.
  • To make a statement – social or political statements, philosophies, beliefs or values that the art embodies.  The art expresses the buyers views.

When it comes down to it “the art we buy is as much about who we are as it is about the artists who create it”

Winter Arrives - Barn wood frame
Winter Arrives by Edward M. Fielding – Barn wood frame http://www.edwardfielding.com

.

Milestone: 1200 Art and Fine Art Photography Sales

Allow me to toot my own horn, as I can’t wait for others to do it. I sell my photography, design work and art on a variety of platforms from Rights Managed Stock via Arcangel to rental art via Turning Art as well as on Red Bubble and Society6 but by far my most successful selling platform to date has been Fine Art America and Pixels.com.

I have my largest portfolio on edward-fielding.pixels.com and this site offers the most combinations of museum quality prints in the form of framed and matted prints, canvas, metal, wood and more.  Plus decor products such as throw pillows, phone cases, bags and more.

In the past few months I’ve punched through the 1,000 sales mark and my collectors keep growing, discovering new, never sold before images from my portfolio of nearly 5,000 fine art photographs and artwork as well as repeat sales of fan favorite images.

Decorators have also discovered a few of my images for their clients and have received a professional discount for large volume buyers through Designer Prints which is a service to those in the trade who need to purchase in volume for their clients or for resale.

Here are some of my top sellers:

Art Prints

Sell Art Online

Photography Prints

Sell Art Online

Sell Art Online

If you want to sell your own artwork take a look at some of my advice on selling artwork articles:

About Fine Art America and Pixels

Selling Art – Search Engine Optimization SEO

5 Don’ts of Selling Artwork Online

Can I make a living at this?

Understanding Print On Demand – Part One

Want to sell your artwork online? Do some math first

Art Prints

I had to chuckle when a new artist on Pixels and Fine Art America was complaining about their lack of sales on the forum recently.  They couldn’t understand why they hadn’t made a sale yet despite having over 1,000+ views.

Really?  1,000 views and they expect the sales to come flooding in?  Think about how many people walk by an artwork at a gallery or even at a mall store window before something sells.

And that’s real people.  People in a retail environment.  People with a wallet in their pocket or cash in their purse.  People who are already in the mood to do a little shopping.

What is a 1,000 views on the Internet?  Most likely its bots.  Little software robots that index the internet every day.  They come to a page, scan the contents and report back to the search engine from which they came.  They are not buyers.  Bots are most likely 99% of the traffic that an internet page receives and bots are not buyers.

Then there are the lookers, tire kickers and browsers.  People looking for free clip art, people looking for free screen savers, people who are just curious, people who are simply at work – bored and playing around.  And perhaps a few are serious buyers.

So out of that 1,000 views, how many are valid potential buyers?  Perhaps three?

Sell Art Online

Now take that three and consider the competition.  Pixels and Fine Art America says they have upwards of 125,000 living artists who use their site to offer their artwork for sale.  125K artists who are uploading something like 6,000 new images on a daily basis.

So this is the kicker from this artist who can’t believe they haven’t sold anything yet.

“Granted, I only have 8-9 drawings posted” and only joined in 2016 and has zero followers.  In other words hasn’t done much at all.

Sell Art Online

POD means Print On Demand not ATM

Uploading images to a POD site and “offering” work is not the same as marketing, promoting and selling your artwork.  POD sites are not ATM machines.  They don’t spit out money without putting in some effort.

Despite what you might have heard, art does not sell itself.  It needs to be seen and it needs to be seen by a lot of people before the right buyer reaches into their pocket and parts with their hard-earned money to purchase said artwork.

Do you have any idea how many buyers there are in the world wanting to purchase your artwork?  Does it appeal to hundreds? Thousands? Millions? A few? Just one? No one?

Some of the work I offer in my portfolio of nearly 5,000 pieces of photography and artwork has never sold – perhaps yet or perhaps never.  Some have sold a few times and a few have sold nearly fifty times.  Some sold in as little as three days, others took three years to find a buyer.

Some have less than 100 views and have sold.  Other have thousands of views and haven’t sold once.

Photography Prints

What does it take to sell artwork on Pixels and Fine Art America and other Print On Demand or POD websites?

There really is not secret formula to selling artwork on POD sites.  Good work, that is in demand, lots of it plus marketing, promotion and time for people to find it is the secret.

  • Professional, top quality work
  • Unique work that sets you apart from the pack
  • Work that fits the audience of the website
  • Lots of inventory to choose from
  • Promotion
  • Social Media activity
  • Marketing
  • Good titles, keywording, descriptions
  • Time for the work to be found by search engines and potential buyers.

 

 

 

Recently Sold On Fine Art America

Another look at which photographs and artwork are hot in February from the portfolio of Edward M. Fielding – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/

Old VW Bus Hand Towel
Old VW Bus Hand Towel

Sold a Hand Towel of Vw Bus Pop Art 5 to a buyer from Ny, NY.

Art Prints

A 6.625″ x 10.000″ print of Vince Lombardi On Perfection shipping to a buyer from Strongsville, OH.

Sell Art Online

A greeting card of What Would Jimmy Buffett Do to a buyer from Tampa, FL.

Photography Prints

Recent sale of a box of greeting cards of Pug Dog Black And White to a buyer from Burlington, MA.

Art Prints

A 30.000″ x 24.125″ print of After Pollock Black And White to a buyer from Glenwood Springs, CO.

Sell Art Online

A greeting card of The Knack Of Flying to a buyer from Bellevue, WA.

Photography Prints
A greeting card of Wild Lady Slippers to a buyer from Columbia City, OR.

Photography Prints

Recent sale of a IPhone 6s Plus Case of Santa Dog Is Coming To Town to a buyer from Muncie, IN.

Photography Prints

A 24.000″ x 36.000″ print of Gates Of Brown University Providence Rhode Island to a buyer from Morton Grove, IL.

 

 

 

Monopoly Tee
Sold a Men’s T-Shirt (Regular Fit) – Black – Medium of Monopoly Original Patent Art Drawing T-shirt to a buyer from Hounslow, State/County – United Kingdom.  link

Recently sold a 36.000″ x 23.750″ metal print of Blue Ridge Mountians to a buyer from Mooresville, NC.

Sell Art Online

Ideas for making money with your camera

The market for photography is $10 billion dollars in the United States and is expect to grow at a rate of 1.8 percent annually.

Still images and video are needed more than ever in the digital age in portraits, business promotion, product photography, food photography, event photography and editorial photography to illustrate articles, news sources and websites. While the costs of photographer and the fees paid to photographers have decreased due to easier to use and process digital photography the need for images is always increasing.

The Photography industry has experienced several changes as digital cameras and post-production technologies have increasingly affected operators. While photographers are benefiting from the changes by increasing their efficiency and availability, consumers are now able to take professional-quality images without the need of a specialist.

Revenue is expected to improve slightly in the next five years as photographer focus on niche markets, such as events, sports and church directory photography.

Common industry services include school and family portraits, special events photography and sports’ photography. As consumers make up the largest buyers of these services, photography studios tend to be concentrated in densely populated areas.

Cities, in addition to being densely populated, have the largest amount of business activity. This leads industry establishments that focus on commercial and industrial photography to also concentrate in densely populated areas although the web allows photographers to find International and Domestic markets.

Top Ways to Make Money With Your Camera

1 – Sell Prints – I talk about how to sell prints of your photographs in my series on Print On Demand sites – http://www.dogfordstudios.com/understanding-print-demand/

You can also sell prints locally at galleries and  arts and crafts fairs.

2 – Stock Photography – You can upload your images to a stock photography agency who will then offer them to image buyers and designers to be used in publications, on the web,  on products etc.

Example of a licensed image.
Example of a licensed image.

For example the above image title “Wash Day” and which I sell as prints has also been licensed for use on the cover of a pet magazine in Florida.  https://edwardfielding.me/2014/02/07/wash-day-makes-the-front-page/

A few things to remember about stock photography:

  • Fine art photographs are not always suitable for stock images and conversely not all stock images make great fine art photographs.
  • Stock photographs need to be useful for the business buyers/designers.  They need copyspace, they need images that will illustrate the products and services they are selling or support the editorial in a magazine or on a blog.
  • A stock portfolio needs to be diverse, constantly updated and have a very large number of unique images to get noticed.  If you think you’ll upload 40 images and then kick back and watch the money flow in, you will be disappointed.

Sell Art Online

3 – Event Photography – Capturing images for an event such as a wedding, party, club, or special occasion is a great way to make money with your camera.  Even though everyone has a camera these days on their smart phone, smart people and people with money to spend on the good things in life know that it better to leave important things like capturing the event in pictures to the pros with the good equipment.  The pro might be the only one not drunk and certainly the only one in the room fully concentrated on getting the job done.

4. Portraits – From Headshots to Mugshots – the ability to photograph people well is the ticket to success.  Landscapes are for the hobbyists and amateurs.  Professionally produced portaits are money in the bank for the professional photographer.  Learn how to make people look good and you will have a successful photography business.
Sell Art Online

Selling Art – Search Engine Optimization SEO

Selling Artwork with Search Engine Optimization

Advice on selling artwork online by successful artist/fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding – www.edwardfielding.com

In order to buy art, collectors must first see it so the can fall in love with it.  In the brick and mortar world this means putting your wall art up in places frequented by potential collectors such as galleries, cafes and exhibits.

The Nest by Edward M. Fielding
The Nest by Edward M. Fielding  http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/the-nest-edward-fielding.html

Selling art online requires putting your artwork in online galleries but mainly creating content that will be collected and indexed by the major search engines.

When someone is in the mood to search for art to buy, you want your artwork or photography to pop to the top of search.  That is what the term “SEO” or “Search Engine Optimization” means.  Making your content (in this case your artwork) optimally positioned to be first found by the search engines and then ranked as high as it can be the search results.

Search engine results are the result of a constantly tweaked formula or algorithm.  A behind the scenes math equation that weights all sorts of variables to bring about the final result.  Elements such as popularity, readability, length of time people spend on the page, number of links going to the page, how many ads are on the page etc etc.  All of these measurements go into the formula to create the final page ranking.

Red Neck Moving Day
Red Neck Moving Day http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/red-neck-moving-day-edward-fielding.html

While search engines such as Google and Bing won’t actually reveal the methods they use to rank websites on their search results, those responsible for the practice of SEO have a pretty good idea which tactics are most effective – and research repeatedly confirms it comes down to just a handful of factors.

Relevant Content Creation

RCC or Relevant Content Creation is considered the most important way to achieve SEO.  You have to think of the search engine as a product.  The goal of any search engine is to be the best product in its class. It does this by satisfying the customers need for fast and relevant results.

The better job the search engine does of bringing you the results you want, the better the product.  So the search engine strives to bring up results that have actual useful information and it does this partly by measuring the amount of time the users spends on the page and the number of links from other sites that lead to this page.

Dirty Dog Laundry Soap
Dirty Dog Laundry Soap http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/dirty-dog-laundry-soap-edward-fielding.html

You can’t really fake good content.  In the old days, you might just fill up a page with keywords and the search engines would send customers to that page.  But now all kinds of other factors are considered such as readability, time spent on the page, other links to the page, social media interaction etc.

Relevant content creation, of course, is what SEO’s most often believe is the most effective SEO tactic. Recent research from Ascend2, in fact, found that 57 percent of respondents say relevant content creation is a highly effective SEO tactic. Other top tactics mentioned in the study include keyword/phrase research (49% cite as highly effective), social media integration (39%), and external/internal linking (36%).

Old Train Bridge
Old Train Bridge http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/2-old-steel-train-bridge-edward-fielding.html

Selling Artwork With Context

To attract search engines to your work you need to surround the work with words.  Visual images can be searched but usually its by people looking to grab a photo for a school report or presentation or something.  Art buyers are going to be searching within an online art gallery or via a search engine. You need to surround your visual artwork with relevant words or in other words put it in context.

Context – the circumstances that form the setting for an event, statement, or idea, and in terms of which it can be fully understood and assessed.

In the SEO world, context is king.  Context can be keywords, a description of an artwork, the biography of the artist, the process behind the artwork, a description of the framing process etc.

In other words tell the story of the artwork for the potential buyer and the search engines.  Give the buyer and the search engine bots that index the Internet, multiple reasons to find, index, discover and learn about your artwork.  Provide interesting details about the work that will entice others to share and link to your work.

The more context you place around your artwork, the more likely it will be found and purchased.

 

About the Author

Before returning to fine art photography and art, Edward M. Fielding had a career in the high tech computer magazine and online content provider world including being the Director of Market Research at BYTE Magazine.

Currently Fielding’s work can be seen on bestselling book covers and in magazine’s around the world as well as in galleries and in the home’s of private collectors.

See more at: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/index.html

More articles on selling artwork online here.

selling artwork buy smart doggie Art Online