Photography Theme: Remote Cabin in the Winter

Theme: Remote Cabin in Winter
Theme: Remote Cabin in Winter

I shoot book cover images for ArcAngel Images and every winter there is one theme I look for – remote, desolate, old buildings.  The type of places where a mystery or crime could take place.

The scene of some terrible drama that occurs during a howling snowstorm.  A place you don’t want your kidnapper to take you.  A place where no one can hear your screams.

Winter Warming Hut
Winter Warming Hut

Perhaps a place where the rabbits were butchered.  A sex crime occurred. A strange old hag lives casting her evil spells.

Maybe a place of poverty and shame.  Growing up in the shadows of the coal fields or where Grandpa sharpened his knives and axes.  Perhaps the place where secrets or fugitives are hidden.  Maybe shelter for that escaped convict from the local prison, unknown to the little girl sent out for kindling or to feed the goats.

Of course these old cabins in the woods or covered in a blanket of fresh winter snow don’t have to be the scene of terrible events.  They can be fond memories, sugaring shacks for boiling maple sap down to sweet syrup, they can be workshops, warm and toasty vacation spots or even warming huts for cross country skiers.

Snow covered log cabin
Snow Covered Log Cabin fine art photograph by Edward M. Fielding

You can see all of the cabin photographs by photographer Edward M. Fielding here  – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/cabin

The cabin photographs in this collectin depict remote cabins, barns, shacks and sheds in all seasons including winter, spring, summer and fall.

These fine art photographs, watercolors and paintings are available as prints rolled in a tube, framed and matted prints from hundreds of combinations of mats and frames, canvas prints, acrylic prints, metal prints, wood prints as well as on products such as tote bags, throw pillows, phone cases, greeting cards and more!

Forsaken Dreams – Fine Art Photography

Forsaken Dreams by Edward M. Fielding

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Who doesn’t have a dream of owning a beach front cottage? Growing up my family owned a tiny cottage in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Build after World War II by my grandfather when there were restrictions on wood, he, like many of the neighbors building up after war, could only get enough lumber for a two-car garage sized cottage, so that is what he built.

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It was walking distance from the beach and hosted many an extended family gathering under its tiny roof. There was one bathroom, and outdoor shower, a small kitchen and two bedrooms with barely enough room for a dresser. One had a short home made bed platform (luckily my parents weren’t tall) and a bunk bed for the kids. Sliding door saved on floor space. There was a ladder up to the attic if anyone dared brave the heat up there.

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In the later years it even had a TV antenna, complete with a manual rotating controller that was used to dial in the one TV station that came in. My three siblings and my Mom all stayed there a few years while my father was stationed in Vietnam. Kind of incredible when I think about it. Later one summer we stayed there while my Dad worked and joined us on the weekends. My older sister was big fan of Love Boat reruns on that black and white TV and kept us all in the cottage until around 11 am when we could finally head down the street to the beach.

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“Forsaken Dreams” by Edward M. Fielding is a photograph of an abandoned fisherman’s cottage in the harbor at North Rustico on Prince Edward Island.  It’s a wonderful ruin of an old cottage listing to one side as it slowly sinks into the soft sand.  It must have been a powerful storm that started the slide and its amazing that the building still stands.  Every time I head back to Prince Edward Island I expect it to be gone, yet it survives.

Forsaken Dreams by Edward M. Fielding
Forsaken Dreams by Edward M. Fielding

The house didn’t rock. At least not in the same time frame of the deep sea fishing boat. After a week on the water anything that didn’t move was heaven on earth. Others join the little lonely house as the fishing village grew and fortunes of the hunting ground were discovered, exploited and depleted. Herring, cod, lobster, clams, mussels – bounty from the sea to be caught and shipped west to the city folks of St. John, Quebec, Montreal and even south by train to Boston and New York. Far away places with ways of life so foreign to the fishermen of Rustico.

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But the little house on the beach did roll with the sands of time. Gone were the rough seaman as time past and the stocks dwindled. Now city people came on holiday to play in the water, eat by the sea and hire fishermen to ferry them around for sport. The waves of the dunes rolled the little house in its perch, pitching it slowly off kilter, the winds ripping at is tar paper siding, the ground opening to swallow it whole.

Maple Syrup Harvest Time in New England

Here in Vermont, New Hampshire and across the maple sugar producing region, the sap has been running early this year.  Typically open house time at the local sugar houses (peak season) is around the 2oth of March but this year the unusually warm weather has created a very short season.

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A good mapling season requires cold nights and warm days. Typically snow is still on the ground even if the country roads are clear but muddy. Traditional maple syrup equipment often included horses and sleds with collection containers to bring the watery sap to the sugar house for boiling down into sweep, sticky syrup.

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Traditionally maple sap is collected by drilling a small hole in a sugar maple tree and the “tap” is hammered in and a galvanized bucket is hung to collect the sap.  A metal cover helps to keep leaves, twigs and bugs out of the sap (sap is also filtered later).  The buckets are emptied into larger containers.  Modern methods use plastic taps and tubing to bring the sap to large collection containers.

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Once the sugar boilers are started, traditionally with wood but some modern houses have been outfitted with natural gas, the evaporators are manned around the clock. Often extended family members and friends help out with the boil and contribute their own maple sap collected on their property.

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Inside the Sugar House

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A farmer feeding wood into the maple sugar evaporator inside the family’s Vermont sugar shack.

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When you buy real natural maple syrup (as opposed to factory produced artificially flavored corn syrup), you are supporting a way of life. In rural area through out New England, local farmers tap maple trees on their land and use traditional wood fired evaporators to boil and reduce the sap into sweet liquid gold. This sugar house in Hartland Four Corners was build in 1954. Four generations of have been involved in the annual spring ritual of harvesting and producing sweet syrup from maple sap in this hot and steamy sugar house.

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When a bucket fills with maple sap, the sap is collected and dumped into a holding tank. Once the holding tank is full, the sap is transported to a sugaring house, where all of the equipment is kept. The sap is poured into a maple syrup evaporator; that’s where it is boiled down. The evaporator is crucial to the maple-syrup-production process. Maple sap is mostly water, and all of this water must be boiled out of the sap to concentrate the sugars into syrup.

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When the sap is poured into the maple syrup evaporator, it is first heated through with steam. The evaporator produces steam, and a series of pipes transports the cold sap through this steam. Once the sap is heated to almost boiling by the steam, it is delivered to large, flat pans where it is boiled until the water evaporates, leaving the sugary syrup behind. The syrup is then drawn into containers and filtered to remove any impurities. After it’s filtered, the syrup is bottled and ready to consume.

“Sweet Steam” was taken at a Vermont Sugar Shack during the mapling season when the sap from maple trees is collected and boiled down to make pure, natural, sweet maple syrup.

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No ingredients are added. It takes 24 gallons of maple tree sap to make one gallon of maple syrup. The maple sugaring season occurs right around the first week of spring when the days are warm and the nights are cold. This is when the sap runs.

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The farmers harvest about seven percent of the tree’s sap which does not hurt the trees. Vermont is the number one maple syrup producer. New Hampshire, Maine and Canada are also large producers of maple syrup.

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Real maple syrup is an all natural product free of alergens and its purchase supports family farms and a quality of life unlike the mass produced sugar water substitute fake factory products pushed by the national brands.

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Photographs of the traditional maple syrup harvest as well as sugar houses around Vermont and New Hampshire can be purchase at – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/maple

photographs for sale

Tough Life on Prince Edward Island

Photography Prints

Note: the watermark in the lower right does not appear in the final print.
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A sinking, decaying, abandoned, beach front cottage on Prince Edward Island, Canada.  Fine art photography by Edward M. Fielding

Maritime Canada is full of quiet beauty in its landscape and within the struggles of man, industry and living against the brutal weather.  Existence is never easy trying to scrape out out a living off of the land and sea when forces of nature work for and against you like the daily tides that hit the island.

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The tar paper shack had been built quickly in the days of yore before the thought of inspections, zoning or regulations. It was placed on a spit of land, a beach dune really of shifting sand. It was a house of convenience rather than luxury. What was luxury anyway other than a roof over one’s head, four walls to keep out the constant wind that blows across the island and a stove to burn drift wood to keep back the damp chill.

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The house didn’t rock. At least not in the same time frame of the deep sea fishing boat. After a week on the water anything that didn’t move was heaven on earth. Others join the little lonely house as the fishing village grew and fortunes of the hunting ground were discovered, exploited and depleted. Herring, cod, lobster, clams, mussels – bounty from the sea to be caught and shipped west to the city folks of St. John, Quebec, Montreal and even south by train to Boston and New York. Far away places with ways of life so foreign to the fishermen of Rustico.

But the little house on the beach did roll with the sands of time. Gone were the rough seaman as time past and the stocks dwindled. Now city people came on holiday to play in the water, eat by the sea and hire fishermen to ferry them around for sport. The waves of the dunes rolled the little house in its perch, pitching it slowly off kilter, the winds ripping at is tar paper siding, the ground opening to swallow it whole. — Edward M. Fielding

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Prince Edward Island can be tough on ships as witnessed by the 63 lighthouses scattered around the island.

You can see all of my lighthouse photographs and artwork here: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/lighthouse

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Art Prints

Photography Prints

 

  1. NORTH CAPE LIGHTHOUSE
  2. TIGNISH RUN LIGHTHOUSE/BIG TIGNISH/JUDE’S POINT
  3. FORMER MIMINIGASH RANGE LIGHT
  4. FORMER NORTHPORT BACK RANGE LIGHT
  5. FORMER CASCUMPEC LIGHTHOUSE
  6. NORTHPORT BACK RANGE LIGHT
  7. FORMER HARDY’S CHANNEL/LITTLE CHANNEL LIGHTHOUSE
  8. MALPEQUE HARBOUR APPROACH LIGHT
  9. FORMER FISH ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE
10. MALPEQUE OUTER BACK RANGE LIGHT
11. MALPEQUE OUTER FRONT RANGE LIGHT
12. FORMER CAPE TRYON
13. CAPE TRYON LIGHTHOUSE
14. NEW LONDON LIGHTHOUSE/ NEW LONDON BACK RANGE LIGHT
15. NORTH RUSTICO HARBOUR LIGHTHOUSE
16. COVEHEAD HARBOUR LIGHTHOUSE
17. ST. PETER’S HARBOUR LIGHTHOUSE
18. SHIPWRECK POINT LIGHTHOUSE/NAUFRAGE LIGHTHOUSE
19. FORMER SHIPWRECK POINT LIGHTHOUSE
20. EAST POINT LIGHTHOUSE
21. SOURIS EAST LIGHTHOUSE
22. FORMER ANNANDALE FRONT RANGE LIGHT
23. ANNANDALE BACK RANGE LIGHT
24. ANNANDALE FRONT RANGE LIGHT
25. FORMER CARDIGAN RIVER RANGE LIGHT
26. GEORGETOWN BACK RANGE LIGHT
27. FORMER GEORGETOWN FRONT RANGE LIGHT
28. GEORGETOWN FRONT RANGE LIGHT
29. PANMURE HEAD LIGHTHOUSE OR PANMURE ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE
30. DOUSE POINT FRONT RANGE LIGHT
31. DOUSE POINT BACK RANGE LIGHT
32. MURRAY HARBOUR BACK RANGE LIGHT/BEACH POINT BACK RANGE LIGHT
33. MURRAY HARBOUR FRONT RANGE LIGHT/BEACH POINT FRONT RANGE LIGHT
34. CAPE BEAR LIGHTHOUSE
35. WOOD ISLANDS LIGHTHOUSE
36. WOOD ISLANDS BACK RANGE LIGHT
37. WOOD ISLANDS FRONT RANGE LIGHT
38. POINT PRIM LIGHTHOUSE
39. BRUSH WHARF FRONT RANGE
40. HASZARD POINT FRONT RANGE
41. HASZARD POINT BACK RANGE LIGHT
42. BRIGHTON BEACH FRONT RANGE
43. BRIGHTON BEACH BACK RANGE LIGHT
44. WARREN COVE BACK RANGE LIGHT
45. WARREN COVE FRONT RANGE LIGHT
46. BLOCKHOUSE POINT LIGHTHOUSE
47. ST. PETER’S ISLAND LIGHT
48. LEARD’S BACK RANGE LIGHT
49. LEARD’S FRONT RANGE LIGHT/PALMER’S BACK RANGE LIGHT
50. WRIGHT’S BACK RANGE LIGHT
51. WRIGHT’S FRONT RANGE LIGHT
52. PORT BORDEN FRONT RANGE LIGHT
53. PORT BORDEN BACK RANGE LIGHT
54. PORT BORDEN PIER LIGHT
55. SEACOW HEAD LIGHTHOUSE
56. FORMER SUMMERSIDE FRONT RANGE LIGHT
57. INDIAN HEAD LIGHTHOUSE
58. SUMMERSIDE BACK RANGE LIGHT
59. SUMMERSIDE OUTER FRONT RANGE LIGHT
60. SUMMERSIDE OUTER BACK RANGE LIGHT
61. CAPE EGMONT LIGHTHOUSE
62. WEST POINT LIGHTHOUSE
63. HOWARD’S COVE/SEAL POINT LIGHTHOUSE