The Barns of Vermont and New Hampshire

Family farms sporting traditional and historic wood framed New England barns and stables still dot the New England landscape in Vermont and New Hampshire.  The barns,  most painted bright red against the summer time green landscape, the brilliant orange, brown and red colors of autumn and the white snowy landscape of winter.  But you can find other colors such as white or “hasn’t been painted in decades” gray.

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A fine white barn in South Woodstock at the Green Mountain Horse Asssociation. Founded in 1926, GMHA is the nation’s oldest continuously operating horse association whose mission is to provide and maintain opportunities for educational and competitive activities for diverse equestrian disciplines. Emphasis is placed on equestrian trails preservation, horsemanship and youth education.

The facility, located in South Woodstock, Vermont, offers a wide range of events to hundreds of equestrians each year in dressage, driving, events, hunter/jumpers, and trail riding. GMHA is dedicated to preserving trails and open space for equestrian use, and the trail network covers over 400 miles.

The 65-acre facility includes stabling for 196 horses, four all-weather arenas with European Geo-Textile footing, a spectacular cross-country course, and driving hazards.

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In Enfield, New Hampshire right next door to the historic Shaker Village is a wildlife refuge and this building is part of the maintenance crew’s facilities.

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One of the most photographed farm spots in Vermont if not the world.  When you think of Vermont, the image that enters your brain might just be Jenne Farm.

Jenne Farm is a farm located in Reading, Vermont. It is one of the most photographed farms in the world, especially in autumn. The farm has appeared in magazine covers, photography books, and a Budweiser television advertisement; it has also served as a setting in the films Forrest Gump and Funny Farm. Photographs of the farm have appeared on posters, postcards and wall calendars.

Despite its fame, the private farm is located along a dirt road and is not heavily promoted. The only sign indicating its presence is a tiny board along Vermont State Route 106 advertising maple syrup.

The farm became noted for photogenic scenery about 1955 when a photography school in South Woodstock discovered it. Later, it appeared as an entry in a Life photo contest, on the cover of Yankee magazine, and in Vermont Life.

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Stowe, Vermont and Waterbury, Vermont have many old farms and old barns including this small horse barn on the way from the Ben and Jerry’s factory and on to the ski resort town of Stowe, Vermont.

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This newer classic New England red barn in Etna, New Hampshire, part of Hanover, NH – home of Dartmouth College, beautifully sits on a hillside over looking the small village.

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In the backroads of Vermont, far from the last waypoint on the map or GPS, wonderful old wooden barns in their unpainted beauty can be found among the brilliant fall foliage.

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A collection of old New England barn buildings with a single red door beyond.  This amazing complex of old barns is found right off the main road in Windsor, Vermont – the birthplace of the state.

Finally a great dump of snow! Nordic skiing in the Upper Valley

After the last couple of years of crummy snow conditions it was great getting trip of blizzards this week!

Some people are getting up tight about snow days and the high school year being extended but who cares? My son’s a senior, his graduation day is set in stone. Bring on the snow!

If you live down in Florida or some place where you don’t have snow, this next video will give you an idea of what you are missing. Sure the shoveling is tough but its good exercise.

During the blizzard I like to stay off the roads and let the snow plow crews do their work. Nothing is worse than having to pull cars out of banks and ditches when the drivers could have just stayed at home or maybe planned ahead for that gallon of milk they do desperately needed in the middle of a blizzard.

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Luckily in my neighborhood I have this great big old dairy barn to photograph. Its wooden red exterior looks great in the billowing snow storm.

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I hiked through the woods, across the road to get these shots of the old red barn in the peak of the onslaught of snow flurries. It was coming down at about two inches an hour at this point and the snow was sliding off the metal roof from the wind blasts.

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Getting up close to the barn took a bit of doing.  I had my knee high boots on but had to deal with an incredibly steep bank created by the plows and then walk through the layers of ice, six inches of crust and then the eight inches or so of powder snow.

In contrast here is what the scene looks like in the summer time.

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Scenes from Around the Upper Valley

Upper Valley Travels

Scenes from Around the Upper Valley

A short movie with scenes from my travels around the Upper Valley region of Vermont and New Hampshire.

New Hampshire and Vermont’s Upper Valley is surrounded by the Green Mountains of Vermont and the White Mountains of New Hampshire and consists of many small, wonderful towns and cities.  Home to DHMC and Dartmouth College, the ninth oldest college in the country and proudly serving the Ivy League community, Hanover New Hampshire offers the hustle and bustle of an upscale-casual city with a small town feel.

The region along the Connecticut river upstream and downstream from Lebanon, New Hampshire and White River Junction, Vermont, is known locally as the “Upper Valley”. The exact definition of the region varies, but it generally is considered to extend south to Windsor, Vermont, and Cornish, New Hampshire, and north to Bradford, Vermont, and Piermont, New Hampshire.

To buy prints, framed artwork, canvas prints, metal, prints as well as products such as tote bags, cell phone cases, throw pillows and more with photographs from the Upper Valley, visit: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/

Old Train Bridge
Old Train Bridge http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/2-old-steel-train-bridge-edward-fielding.html
Red Door Winter Barn, Windsor, Vermont
Red Door Winter Barn, Windsor, Vermont
Dartmouth College in Hanvover, NH framed art.
Dartmouth College in Hanover, NH framed art.
Ely Vermont Old Wooden Silo And Barn Black And White Framed Print
Ely Vermont Old Wooden Silo And Barn Black And White Framed Print
Inside The Horse Barn Black And White
Inside The Horse Barn Black And White
Edward Fielding

Edward Fielding

Etna, NH

NOTE: The watermark DOES NOT appear on the final print.
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I use my photography to communicate my vision of the world. My work deals with storytelling in light and shadow from the beauty, texture and shape of every day objects to wonders of the natural world. — Edward M. Fielding

Edward M. Fielding
Fine Art Photography
www.edwardfielding.com

Fine art photography and digital art by artist Edward M. Fielding. Fielding is an artist working in the photography and digital media. As a freelance artist my work is currently represented by several leading stock agencies.

My work has appeared in featured in numerous magazines, greeting cards, advertising, book covers and media companies as well as been widely shown and juries into fine art shows.

Recently I was one of the featured artists in the PhotoReel art show at Gallery W at the Whitney in the Berkshires.

In addition to fine art photography, I enjoy being a staff educator at the AVA Gallery and Arts Center in Lebanon, NH teaching creative technology such as Scratch and Lego Mindstorms robotics to elementary and middle school children.

Many of the images featured here on Fine Art America are available for rights managed licensing for book covers and other projects from Arc Angel Images – http://tinyurl.com/aww2wzl
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All work in this gallery is the original work of Edward M. Fielding. It is for sale, copyrighted to Edward M. Fielding and, as such, is protected by US and International Copyright laws.

Copyright Edward Fielding All Rights Reserved. COPYRIGHT NOTICE:
Edward Fielding retains all rights to these images. It is illegal to copy, scan or duplicate from the website in any form.
Images on this site may not be used for personal or commercial use without written permission by Edward Fielding.

Ye Old Barn – Working a Scene in Photography

Working a Scene – Vermont Barn

The beginner photographer approaches a scene, raises their camera and “takes” the picture. A seasoned photographer “works” the scene, studying all the possibilities of composition from various angles.  Unless you work out all of the possibilities of a scene, you don’t come away with the best possibility.  Often this requires revisiting a scene more than once, perhaps in different seasons.

In the video above fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding (www.edwardfielding.com) comes upon an old historic New England barn and explores the possibilities of the scene at a location in Windsor, Vermont.

This old barn complex in Windsor, Vermont is eye catching when driving by with its complex arrangement of buildings, weathered boards, red painted doors etc but capturing the feeling of the place is different than snapping a shot from the road.  You have do actually engage in the landscape and explore the various angles and arrangements of the composition.  Bottom line is to get into the scene and make an photograph rather than take a snapshot.

Below are some photographs of this area taken at different times of the year as well as some thoughts by other photographers on how to work a scene in photography.

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“Making a picture just right takes time, even when the thing you’re photographing isn’t moving. Instead, you do the moving — closer, not so close — change lenses, commit to a tripod, micro compose some detail, step back, reconsider, recompose, repeat. And when it looks right it also feels right — just so.”
— Sam Abell, from The Life of a Photograph

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“The compositional dance is about figuring out a way to move you and your camera, which in turn moves the smallest of details inside your viewfinder for maximum visual impact. You can make use of all photographic techniques to create the atmosphere or emotion you are feeling and want to transmit. It’s about recognizing and understanding what it is that attracted you to the subject matter in the first place, and then determining — through concentration and instinct — how best to communicate those feelings through the photograph.” – Steve Simon

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“We don’t always have the time or opportunity to revisit a given scene many times in order to make ourselves happy; however, we should at least be convinced that we have produced the best possible image given the limitations of our own visit. This means that even if a scene is immediately interesting/ arresting, the first image may not necessarily be the best one. Sometimes our instincts are right, sometimes our timing is lucky, and it is; more often than not, there’s always something to be improved.

If you take a look at the work of great photographers immediately before and after a famous image – the Magnum Contact Sheets book is highly recommended for this because it puts the chosen frame in context of what happened immediately before/ after by showing the rest of the frames on the roll – you’ll see that they all have something in common: they spend a lot of time experimenting with variations on the same basic idea, exploring options, and usually end fairly soon after getting the shot they want.” – Ming Thein

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“If you’re walking around a city or village and you stop to take a photo, that means something caught your eye (enough to make you stop and photograph it, right?). Don’t just take one shot, shrug your shoulders, and move on. Remember, something made you stop, so there’s probably something there, and taking one quick snapshot probably won’t uncover it.

Your job as a photographer is to “work that scene” and find out what it was that captured your attention. The first step is simply to slow down—stop, look around for a moment, and see what it was that drew your eye in the first place. Was it the color, was it a doorway, an archway, was it some little feature, or something big? If you can figure it out, then you’ll know what to shoot, but more often than not, we can’t exactly describe what it was that made us stop and shoot, but it definitely was something.

Your job is to find it, and to work that scene by trying these techniques: (1) Shoot the area with different focal lengths—shoot a few shots in really wide angle, then try 100mm, then zoom in tight, and see what you find. Stop and look at your LCD to see if you’re getting close. If you see something that looks like it has possibilities, then (2) try changing your viewpoint. Shoot it from a very low angle (get down on one knee) or try shooting it from above (look for stairs you can shoot from or a rooftop angle). This can make the shot come alive. If that looks really good and you’re getting close to nailing the shot, then (3) try varying your white balance (try changing it to Cloudy and see if having the shot look warmer looks better, or try Shade for a warmer look yet). Try all these things (work the scene) and my guess is one of those shots will bring a big smile to your face.”  – Scott Kelby

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More award winning Vermont Barn photographs – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/barn+vermont?page=1

Postcards from New Hampshire

Video Postcards from New Hampshire

With summer like weather lately, I decided to strike when the skies were clear and hit the road around rural New Hampshire this week and grab some photographs and a bit of video for my stock video collection on Shutterstock as well has create some promotional videos.

The above video features some rural scenes from around the Upper Valley, White Mountains and Lakes Regions of New Hampshire.  New Hampshire doesn’t have one single feature that you can put your finger on and say “Oh that’s New Hampshire”, rather its the sum of its parts, a small but vibrant sea coast region around Portsmouth and Rye, the lakes region dominated by the large body of water known as Lake Winnipesaukee, the Upper Connecticut River Valley with Hanover, home to Dartmouth College and other compact villiage towns and the mountain region of The White Mountain National Forest.

Tucked in and around the region are small family farms, quaint country stores, covered bridges, wildlife, hiking trails, recreational trails, mountains, forests, camping, history and more.  There might not be one single thing to describe New Hampshire with but its the sum of its parts and the totality of outdoors activities you can find here.  Now wonder so many people from the congested Boston area head to New Hampshire on the weekends.  New Hampshire has room to breath in the fresh air.

My photographs and artwork from around New Hampshire and the entire New England region can be seen and purchased as prints and products at my portfolio – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/new+hampshire

Barns of Etna New Hampshire

This video presents some of the classic New England red barns you can see in Etna, New Hampshire.  Etna is the rural, laid back part of Hanover, NH and is popular with bikers, cross country skiiers, joggers and even Back Country Tours.  The Appalachian Trail runs through both downtown Hanover and rural Etna.

The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail or simply the A.T., is a marked hiking trail in the eastern United States extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. The trail is approximately 2,200 miles (3,500 km)[a] long, though the precise length changes over time as parts are modified or rerouted. The trail passes through the states of Georgia, North Carolina,Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

See more great barn photography and artwork here:  http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/barn

 

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Classic New England red barn in color pencil effect from an original photograph by Edward M. Fielding – www.edwardfielding.com
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A beautiful old red barn found along Route 10 or the Dartmouth College Highway which runs along the Connecticut River on the New Hampshire side.

Classic New England Barns

Classic New England Barns in Etna New Hampshire

Video presentation with examples of classic New England style barns found in the Etna, New Hampshire town just outside of Hanover and within the region known as the Upper Valley.

Videographer and fine art photographer often chooses these classic New England barns of Vermont and New Hampshire as subject matter for his landscape photography and prints are available including framed artwork, canvas, acrylic, prints as well as products such as tote bags and throw pillows. Most of the images in the barn portfolio were take in the surrounding area of Vermont and New Hampshire with the occasional barn from Montana or Wyoming.

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A barn is an agricultural building usually located on farms and used for various purposes. In the North American area, a barn refers to structures that house livestock, including cattle and horses, as well as equipment and fodder, and often grain. As a result, the term barn is often qualified e.g. tobacco barn, dairy barn, sheep barn, potato barn. In the British Isles and Continental Europe, the term barn is restricted mainly to storage structures for unthreshed cereals and fodder, the terms byre or shippon being applied to cow shelters, whereas horses are kept in buildings known as stables. On the Continent, however, barns were often part of integrated structures known as byre-dwellings (or housebarns in US literature). In addition, barns may be used for equipment storage, as a covered workplace, and for activities such as threshing.

 

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The New England Barn was the most common style of barn built in most of the 19th century in rural New England and variants are found throughout the United States. This style barn superseded the ”three-bay barn” in several important ways. The most obvious difference is the location of the barn doors on the gable-end(s) rather than the sidewall(s). The New England and three bay barns were used similarly as multipurpose farm buildings (housing animals, crop storage and other uses all in one building) but the New England barns are typically larger and have a basement. Culturally the New England Barn represents a shift from subsistence farming to commercial farming thus are larger and show significant changes in American building methods and technologies. Most were used as dairy barns but some housed teams of oxen which are generally called teamster barns. Sometimes these barns are simply called “gable fronted” and “gable fronted bank barns” [4] but these terms are also used for barns other than the New England style barn such as in Maryland and Virginia which is not exactly the same style as found in New England. A similar style found in parts of the American mid-west and south is called a transverse frame barn or transverse crib barn.

 
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Classic New England Barns by Edward M. Fielding – See more at: NEW ENGLAND BARN PHOTOGRAPHS AND ARTWORK

Amazing Examples of Sunset Photographs

Sunset Photographs by Edward M. Fielding – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/art/sunset
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Sunrise or sun up is the instant at which the upper edge of the Sun appears on the horizon in the morning.The term can also refer to the entire process of the Sun crossing the horizon and its accompanying atmospheric effects.

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Exposure tips for Sunset or Sunrise photos:

  • Use a tripod to better compose your shot and to allow for a variety of camera settings or to blur the water.
  • Shoot at a variety of exposures – get out of automatic mode and take control of your camera by using manual mode.  Take a reading of the light and then try various exposures.  You have plenty of time to capture a multitude of exposure settings.  There is no right or wrong exposure on a sunset to experiment!
  • Bracketing – Another technique to try to get the right exposure is ‘bracketing’ where you look at what the camera suggests you take the picture at and then take a few shots at both under and over that mark. ie if your camera says to shoot at 1/60th of a second at f/8 you would shoot off a shot at 1/60 at f/5.6 and then at f/11. In doing so you end up with a series of shots at different exposures which will all give you slightly different results and colors. Most DSLR’s and some point and shoot digital cameras have a built in bracketing feature so you don’t need to do this manually – learn how to use it!
  • Auto Exposure Lock – Another exposure trick, if you don’t have a bracketing mode or don’t feel confident in using it is if your camera has ‘auto exposure lock’ which allows you to point your camera at a darker place and lock in exposure for that spot (ie you could point it at the ground in front of you and lock in that exposure) and then reframe the picture looking at the sunset. This will mean you get a more over exposed shot.
  • Put the camera in “Daylight” white balance.  Auto White Balance will remove the warm tones of the sunset.  You can also try shooting in ‘cloudy’ or ‘shade’ which are usually used in cooler lights and tell your camera to warm things up a little.  Also shoot in RAW format so you can change the white balance settings in post processing.

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To get a silhouette, expose for the sky and not the object.  You might have to push the blacks in post processing to get totally black subjects against a sunset sky.

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Sun flares or lens flare can create an interesting look and can be enhanced in post processing.

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Locations north of the Arctic Circle and south of the Antarctic Circle experience no sunset or sunrise on at least one day of the year, when the polar day or the polar night persists continuously for 24 hours.

Sunset creates unique atmospheric conditions such as the often intense orange and red colors of the Sun and the surrounding sky.

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Sunset or sundown, is the daily disappearance of the Sun below the western horizon as a result of Earth’s rotation.

The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment when the trailing edge of the Sun’s disk disappears below the horizon. Near to the horizon, atmospheric refraction causes the ray path of light from the Sun to be distorted to such an extent that geometrically the Sun’s disk is already about one diameter below the horizon when sunset is observed.

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The spinning Earth lit by the Sun as seen from far above the North Pole. All along the terminator, the rays from the sun hit Earth horizontally, neglecting any atmospheric effects and Earth’s orbital motion.

Sunset is distinct from dusk, which is the time when the sky becomes completely dark (apart from artificial light). This occurs when the Sun is about 18 degrees below the horizon. The period between sunset and dusk is called twilight.

The Pursuit of Photography has its Perils

The pursuit of photography is not without perils.

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Hidden dangers, risks, pitfalls, random acts, slips, falls, lost of equipment, theft, accidents, sunburn, windburn, exposure, danger, attacks, animals, people, mud, snow, rain….All kinds of things can occur when one is in pursuit of a photograph.

I’ve had my slips. Once trying to get a shot of an icy waterfall, I slipped sideways on the trail – fell right on my tripod bending the leg and bruising my ribs.

I’ve had equipment malfunctions or shall we say zipper malfunctions where a Canon L lens fell out of my backpack on to a paved parking lot. The only thing that saved it from utter destruction was the lens hood.

On another adventure my car got stuck in the snow and I had to walk to the closest general store to ask some nice farmer to help pull my car out of the drift.

Then there is always the random threat of attracting too much attention alone in remote areas with thousands of dollars on your back. Luckily I’ve only met chatty fishermen or the curious “what cha taking a picture of” kind of encounters. In the national parks the threat is typically a gear hound coming up to show you their new camera.

The perils I typically try to keep in mind are the slips and fall hazards as I try to get into position around fast moving water. But I’m also wary of being shot by a hunter in turkey season, or deer season or whatever season is going on, being run off the road by a hay truck, or being shot by some gun nut as a hunt around a property that appears to be abandoned.

Dogs are by far the most common threat I’ve encountered as I hunt around rural Vermont and New Hampshire for photographic possibilities. Where ever there is a house, there is typically a dog running around and they are typically loose. I’ve had to back away towards the car on a number of occasions. Just yesterday I was taking a photo of an old antique Ford sedan in a field and this dog came out and started barking at me. I suppose I should carry some kind of dog spray like a postal worker.

The thing is I use my camera as an excuse to get myself into situations that may or may not the most safe so extra caution is required.

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The Bath Covered Bridge is a historic covered bridge over the Ammonoosuc River off US 302 and NH 10 in Bath, New Hampshire. The bridge, built in 1833 by the town of Bath, has a span of over 390 feet (120 m) and a roadbed that is just over 22 feet (6.7 m) wide. The bridge consists of four spans supported by Burr trusses.  It also features an enclosed sidewalk. The bridge is posted as a one lane bridge for six tons, passenger cars only.

New – Farm Life Photography Posters

New to Dogford Studios is a series of photograph poster prints for sale dealing with the subject matter of farm life in the Upper Valley, Vermont, New Hampshire as well as images from as far away as Prince Edward Island, Canada, Upstate New York and Montana among other rural areas.  Vintage tractors in the field, old family farms, abandoned falling down barns as well as going concerns harvesting and baling hay.  Hardworking New England dairy farms to gentleman farms of the idle rich.

An old rusty vintage truck sits under a flowering apple tree.  A pair of towering silos remind us of a farming way of life that has changed so much.  A vintage tractor still in use turns over soil on a hill side in Stowe, Vermont.

tractor
A vintage tractor on a hill in Stowe, Vermont

Part of an ongoing series of fine art photographs of farm life around New England and Upstate New York by photographer Edward M. Fielding featuring scenes of country and rural life including landscapes, barns, farms, agricultural scenes, livestock, buildings, farm houses, crops, fields, silos, back roads, country lanes and everyday life in Vermont, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Maine, New York and beyond.

old truck
An old rusty farm truck under a flowering apple tree in Quechee, Vermont.

Edward M. Fielding is an award winning artist whose fine art photography can be seen Internationally on the pages of magazines and book covers as well as in galleries and private collections in the New England region.

Silos
A pair of old silos outside of Burlington, Vermont

Over 3,500 images from Edward M. Fielding are also available as framed and matted artwork, metal prints, canvas prints and more via his portfolio on Pixels.com at: http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/