New! Vintage Beach House Decor

Custom frame vintage sea life decor
Custom frame vintage sea life decor

Introducing a new collection of vintage nautical sea life prints with sea shells, tall ships, crabs, sea horses and more.  Each design can be ordered frame and matted from our collection of hundreds of papers, mats and frames from rustic cottage to chic modern designs.

Custom beach house decor
Custom beach house decor

These nautical designs can be ordered as prints, framed wall art, canvas prints, metal prints, wood prints, acrylic prints as well as rolled in a tube for framing locally or in your existing frames.  Products such as tote bags and throw pillows are also available.
Sell Art OnlinePhotography PrintsSell Art OnlineSell Art OnlinePhotography PrintsPhotography PrintsSell Art OnlineSell Art OnlinePhotography PrintsPhotography Prints

You can see the entire collection of “Art for the Beach House” including framed artwork, photographs, drawings, images as well as vintage artwork here – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/art+for+the+beach+house

Vintage Octopus Illustration
Vintage Octopus Illustration

Art PrintsArt Prints

Five reasons people give away their art

Back in the day I was the Director of Market Research at BYTE magazine.  My job was to prove the value of our readership for the ad sales staff.  I used to cringe when the young, inexperienced sales people used to come back to the publisher with some truly awful deals that would basically be giving away ad space.  Any fool can give things away for less than their value.   A seasoned professional or informed amateur recognizes the value of their work and the market needs.

The Line Up
The Line Up – call in the usual suspects – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/the-line-up-edward-fielding.html

Why do people give away their photographs and art?

The global art market achieved total sales of $63.8 billion in 2015.  People want to buy art and photography for their home and office.  They need to purchase art and photography for commercial purposes such as advertising, web pages, brochures, magazines, books, etc yet some people continue to give away their artwork and photographs or seriously undervalue their work.

Why is this?  I can think of five reasons:

Ignorance – They don’t understand the value of images in today’s marketplace and don’t realize the value of what they have. I recently sold an image for $360 profit a friend gave me. He didn’t understand the value of the image he had and I offered to sell it for him.  Images have value in the fine art market and commercial market.  It is just a matter of realizing it.

Exposure – Photographers and artists are often under the impression that giving away their images will somehow lead to future sales or recognition. The problem is that millions of images are given away every day on social media and there isn’t enough “exposure” to go around. What’s the value of this exposure? Perhaps 1 cent in today’s market. People value what they pay for – no one brags about art they got for free. And no one who has gotten something for free is going to pay for it the next time. They’ll just look for another free source the next time. And the value of someone looking for freebies as a “collector” is worthless. You want to cultivate a follow of people who value what you are offering, not people looking for freebies.

They are amateurs or hobbyists – The amateur or hobbyist is not looking to make a living on their photography or artwork.  They simply enjoy producing images for fun and are happy enough for others to look at their images.  They don’t want to the pressure of having to ask for money and would rather just give away their images.  They live for likes and shares.   The problem with this mindset is that it brings down the over all market and prevents the amateur or hobbyist from ever becoming a professional.  After being conditioned with instant success from likes and shares of their freebies, they are unprepared with standing up for the true value of their work and asking for money for their time, skill and effort.  The advanced amateur or hobbyist is setting themselves up for being asked to shoot weddings, soccer games, portraits for free.

They want to build up a portfolio – This might be the best reason to actually giving away services for free.  If you need to create a portfolio and need access to models or locations or maybe even a good project idea.  But there is no reason to give your time and effort for nothing.  Barter and exchange services instead.  Trade headshots for modeling time.  Create a video for a local business in exchange to some free time at the gym or on the massage table.  Don’t work for free, instead exchange one valuable service for another.

They don’t know how easy it is to take their goods to market – Some artists and photographers simple don’t know how easy it is to participate in the art and photography markets.  In the old days perhaps the only way to sell your art and photography was to take your portfolio around to galleries or sell directly to the public.  But with the Internet there are countless markets amateurs and professional photographers and artists can participate .  Stock agencies cater to professional image buyers and online galleries and print on demand sites sell directly to the public.  I explain how to sell via POD sites in these blog posts:

How to Succeed in Fine Art Photography

How to Succeed in Fine Art Photography with Brooke Shaden plus further reading.

“Anyone can become a fine art photographer, but not everyone can become a gallery-represented artist.”

Talent alone will not bring you recognition as a fine art photographer. For that, you need exposure to collectors and museums. Galleries can give you that exposure, but first you need an effective marketing plan to reach the galleries. You will find that plan in From Photographer to Gallery Artist.

Author Kara Lane conducted hundreds of hours of research, and contacted over sixty galleries, to find the best strategies for getting your fine art photography into galleries. Now she is sharing the secrets she discovered with you.

In this complete guide to finding gallery representation, you will learn:

  • The criteria galleries use to evaluate fine art photography
  • Three primary resources for identifying the best galleries for you
  • The tools you need to showcase your images and experience
  • Six major marketing strategies for attracting gallery representation
  • Key issues to discuss with galleries before agreeing to representation
  • How eight famous fine art photographers achieved their success
  • Self-assessment questions to help clarify what you want from your life and art
  • Lists of recommended portfolio review events, art fairs, juried shows and competitions, art magazines and blogs, artist websites, and other resources to help you become a gallery-represented fine art photographer
  • With your talent, effort, and persistence…and the research and marketing strategies in From Photographer to Gallery Artist…you can achieve gallery representation!

Did you know? Fine Art Photography – Known also as “photographic art“, “artistic photography” and so on, the term “fine art photography” has no universally agreed meaning or definition: rather, it refers to an imprecise category of photographs, created in accordance with the creative vision of the cameraman.

“Fine art is about an idea, a message, or an emotion. The artist has something that they want to have conveyed in their work.

That idea or message may be something small, a single word such as abandon, or it may be a whole statement, like exploring the way the moon affects the tides. It is a start. It is like a hypothesis.”


In recent years as the field of photography has exploded, many photographers consider selling their work to make a profit and to help defray the high costs of equipment. But, many photographers don’t have the business and marketing knowledge required to successfully sell fine art photographs; and many of those who have tried have been met with disappointment. Until now, little information of value has been available.

In Marketing Fine Art Photography, Alain Briot offers practical, up-to-date and field-tested marketing techniques from the viewpoint of a fine art landscape photographer who earns a living from the sale of his fine art prints.

Briot teaches that by taking control of the selling process, you can increase your profits and, ultimately, direct your own destiny. Briot’s approach is based on offering quality not quantity; and offering something unique, rather than something that is mass-produced. Though directed toward selling fine art, this method can be applied to other products.

After a series of trials and errors, Briot devised a marketing system that allowed him to get out of debt, pay for a state-of-the-art studio, and purchase his first home, all from the sale of his photography. Briot has taught fine art photography marketing to numerous students in seminars, through one-on-one consulting, and through his Marketing Mastery tutorial DVD.

Topics include:

Defining fine art photography
Wholesale, retail, and consignment
Knowing your customer
Where to sell and how to price fine art
Fundamentals of marketing and salesmanship
Profitability and honesty in business
Packing and shipping fine art
Common marketing mistakes
The unique selling proposition (USP)

New Signed and Numbered Limited Edition Prints

New Signed and Numbered Limited Edition Prints by Edward Fielding on Zatista

 

The online gallery, Zatista handles a number of limited edition series of photographs by fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding.  These are signed and numbered prints limited to 100 copies or less of each image in the size described.  The prints are shipped directly from the artist in a mailing tube and include a certificate of authenticity.

As a collector who wants something more special than an open edition reproduction, these prints will satisfy the desire to own something of limited quantity.

New Releases

The following prints by Edward FIelding have recently been release from Zatista.  Each is a gallery quality Giclée print on natural white, matte, ultra smooth, 100% cotton rag, acid and lignin free archival paper using Epson K3 archival inks. Custom trimmed with 2″ border for framing.

Silver Spoonful
Silver Spoonful
Silver Spoonful Black and White
by Edward Fielding
$450.00
Edition: 100
Size: 17″ x 21″ with 2 inch boarder
A Woman Scorn
A Woman Scorn
Woman Scorn
by Edward Fielding
$450.00
Edition: 100
Size: 17″ x 21″ with 2 inch boarder
Cardboard Divide
Cardboard Divide
CARDBOARD DIVIDE GRID SERIES
by Edward Fielding
$450.00
Edition: 100
Size: 17″ x 21″ with 2 inch boarder
Tornado
Tornado
CAPE TRYON VORTEX BLACK AND WHITE
by Edward Fielding
$450.00
Edition: 100
Size: 17″ x 21″ with 2 inch boarder
Early battery cells
Early battery cells
BATTERY CELLS GRID SERIES
by Edward Fielding
$450.00
Edition: 100
Size: 17″ x 21″ with 2 inch boarder
Old Train Bridge
Old Train Bridge
OLD TRAIN BRIDGE, BATH NH
by Edward Fielding
$450.00
Edition: 100
Size: 17″ x 23″ with 2 inch boarder

About Zatista

Every single day we’re hard at work building a company that provides you with the absolute best possible art buying experience out there. We believe buying original art should be exciting, fun, and incredibly easy. The art we present to you is from hand selected artists and galleries, affordable, and always of the highest quality.

You don’t have to be a Rockefeller to buy or understand art

Have you ever walked into an art gallery and felt like you didn’t belong there? Ever felt like art is only for the rich and famous? It’s all nonsense, so don’t believe the hype. 99% of us aren’t “art collectors”, but we know what we like when we see it. Buying art should cause smiles and immense joy, never anxiety. We believe so much in this philosophy that we back each and every purchase on Zatista 100%. If you are not completely satisfied with the work you bought, let us know and we’ll take it back. No questions asked. Its that simple.

Selling Artwork – Plan Ahead

Selling Artwork – Christmas 2017 Art Selling Season Starts Now

Sell More Artwork By Planning Ahead – One of my families favorite Christmas season movies is “Elf” and there is a scene at the end where Santa tells the elves “congratulations for a great Christmas”.  They all cheer and then get back to work on next year’s Christmas!  No rest for the weary at the North Pole.

Sell Art Online

A friend of mine is a product designer for the electronics industry.  Early January he is always crushed with business producing mock ups for the February trade shows.

All across the toy industry, designers are finalizing their designs for next year’s toys which will be manufactured all summer.  Cooking magazine art directors are putting the final touches on their Halloween photoshoots right now.  Book publishers are meeting with Christmas themed book writers in late winter.

Art Prints

The point is that the Christmas selling season starts now – not in December 2017.

Missed Out On The Christmas Buying Spree? What Are You Going To Do About It

Ok, many of you are not experiencing a jump in sales this Christmas season and perhaps are discouraged by hearing about other artists enjoying increased sales this season. Let’s face it the moment after you congratulate someone on a sale, the first thought is what do they have that I ain’t got?

So what are you going to do about it to build your business up to be ready to take advantage of more sales next Holiday season? Are you just going to droop your head down and say whoa is me? Or are you going to make a plan? How about a real business plan? For many of us this is a business, its time to start acting as such.

Art Prints

1.  Are you going to analysis your offerings and offer more of what people want to buy and less of what only you like?

2.  Are you going to increase your social networking efforts?
3.  Are you going to get an artist website and blog?
4.  Are you going to increase the number of markets you participate in?
5.  Are you going to improve your skills and offer better work?
6.  Create more places where people can buy your work?
7.  Communicate with potential buyers?
8.  Stop spending valuable time commiserating with others who are not selling?
9. Stop blaming your lack of sales on things like the economy, or slow networks, or Amazon, or the world that is conspiring against you?
10. Are you going to DO SOMETHING about it?

How about it? Anyone got any action plans for 2017? You better because your competition does and they  working hard to create great art and marketing for the upcoming Christmas season that starts today.

Pugs Book
Pugs Book by Edward M. Fielding http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/

 

About the Author

Artist Edward M. Fielding is a successful artist/designer/photographer on Fine Art America, Pixels and other POD sites as well as an International stock image supplier whose work has been featured in magazines and on book covers around the globe.  His whimsical books of dog photos can be found on Amazon.com.

https://www.createspace.com/4070210

https://www.createspace.com/5240200

Generating traffic to your artwork

Getting more people to see your artwork and hopefully purchase it

Art does not sell within a vacuum.  And art can’t be purchase without first being seen.  The more people who see your work, the more potential your artwork as to being sold.  How do you get more people to see your work?  Are all viewers equal? How do you generate organic traffic? What is organic traffic?

Art Prints

In totality there are lots of ways for people to see your work:

  • Gallery visits
  • Art festivals
  • Galleries
  • Museums
  • Magazines
  • Newspapers
  • On the street
  • On the Internet

Online there are two main ways to generate “traffic” the generic and cold term for web site visitors (i.e. people who might buy your work).  Offline at retail space this “traffic” might be referred to as foot traffic.

The presence and movement of people walking around in a particular space. Foot traffic is important to many types of businesses, particularly retail establishments, as higher foot traffic can lead to higher sales. Strategies businesses can use to increase their foot traffic include holding grand openings and other promotional events such as demonstrations, giveaways, sales and charitable fundraisers.

Photography Prints

First the terms: organic traffic vs. paid traffic:

Organic traffic generally refers to non-paid traffic, so includes traffic from:

  • Search engines like Google, Bing and Yahoo.
  • Social media sites like Twitter, Facebook and Pinterest.
  • Referral traffic from other sites – visitors arriving at your site after clicking on a link on another website.
  • Direct traffic – someone typing in your URL into a browser.
  • Blogs – links from blogs describing your process or artwork
  • News – links from press releases, news articles and other press about your work.
  • YouTube – referrals and links from your YouTube or Vimeo videos.

Such traffic is all achieved organically, rather than through a source of advertising or paid promotion of some kind.

On the other hand…

Paid traffic is where you are spending money to attract those visitors to your website. This might include:

  • Using paid listings on search engines.
  • Paying to promote your content/link on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter and give it a much wider audience.
  • Showing ads on other sites around the net, usually using an ad network like Google’s Display Ads within Adwords.
  • Visitors arriving at your site because of an affiliate program you run, i.e. incentives others to link through to your site in return for monetary compensation of some kind, usually either on a sale or some other user action after they arrive.

Ninety percent of selling is conviction, and 10 per cent is persuasion. – Shiv Khera

Art Prints

Not All Traffic Is Created Equal

Of course  not all traffic is created equal.  Consider the value of a targeted mailing to active art buyers vs. a mailing to the general public.  Or the value of a person walking into a high end gallery in NYC vs. someone walk into the decor section at Pier One.  Two different buyers with vastly different sales potential and people who will most likely be attuned to a different sale pitch.

The expectations of the person walking into a high end art gallery are different than the Pier One customer.  The gallery patron is expecting artwork of a certain quality and price point, as is the random Pier One customer.  The Pier One customer is not expecting one of a kind work or a one of a kind artwork price point.  While the gallery patron is looking for something exclusive and perhaps something that will be of investment grade artwork.

But compare this to someone who simply wandered into each store randomly as they were looking to have their shoes shined.  They weren’t looking for artwork to buy and they might not even appreciate artwork.  And besides they only have $20 in their pocket to get their shoes shined and perhaps pick up a newspaper and cup of coffee.
Art Prints
It would take a heck of a lot more salesmanship to sell some art to this random person.

Creating Targeted Traffic

This is why you want to create targeted traffic to your artwork.  Targeted means you are messaging people who are in the market for what you are selling.  You can do this in two ways.  One – push messages at people who have been identified as members of your target market – usually this can only be done via demographics such as sex, age, income etc.

Art magazines are a good example of an advertising environment that includes a rich targeted audience for artwork messaging.  But you will also get a lot of people within that audience who are other artists trying to sell their own stuff.  In the magazine world they call this “concentration” and sell advertising based on this concentrated audience.  For example they might show audience stats to a gallery showing that “30 percent of readers have purchased art in the past year” or something.

But this type of traffic has several drawbacks:

  1.  It costs money
  2. It depends on the effectiveness of your advertising material
  3. You never really know if traffic you are paying for matches your artwork.
  4. There is a lot of fake traffic – bots, third world country click farms.

Salesmanship is limitless. Our very living is selling. We are all salespeople. James Cash Penney

 

Organic Traffic:  Striking Gold

Self-selected, organic traffic is the gold standard of web traffic.  People who discover your artwork on their own, from their own explorations.

Your job as an artist, small business person, entrepreneur, art marketer and art salesperson is to create material that will attract people and potential buyers to your artwork.

Ideas for generating organic traffic to your artwork:

  • Create YouTube videos showing your process
  • Describe your process, motivation,
  • Announce shows, openings, new series, sales
  • Use social media – everything and anything – Facebook, Google+, Instagram – engage your audience and build a following.
  • Teach and give workshops
  • Send out postcards and news articles.
  • Write blog entries and promote your ideas.

“If you take a print magazine with a million person circulation, and a blog with a devout readership of 1 million, for the purpose of selling anything that can be sold online, the blog is infinitely more powerful, because it’s only a click away.” – Timothy Ferriss

Build a funnel to channel organic traffic to your artwork

Sales funnel for driving art sales
Sales funnel for driving art sales

The goal is to use every avenue you can think of to attract potential customers to your artwork where hopefully they will fall in love with it and purchase a print or product.

  • Increase awareness of you, your brand, your artwork.  Make sure potential buyers understand that your work is for sale.
  • Create interest in your work by letting your follows behind the scenes so they can see how you create your work.  Show our process.
  • Help potential buyers purchase our work by explaining the various products available so they can make a decision.
  • Lastly have an easy to use method of completing the sales transactions.

How I became a successful selling artist

I sell regularly on Fine Art America but it took me many years of building up an audience and filling the funnel to get to this point.  Filling the funnel can take years before it starts paying off.  The good news is most people give up after a few months so for those who stick to it, you’ll reap the benefits.

Here are some of my funnel filling venues:

Granted you need high quality work that people want to buy.  That is the first step.  But after that, you need to get people to see it.  Good luck!

Suggested further reading:

Sold This Week

Recently Sold Artwork by Edward M. Fielding

A rundown of what’s been selling from the portfolio of Edward M. Fielding. The hottest prints and products sold this week.

Tote bag featuring Central Park New York
NYC Tote Bag – Central Park

Tote Bag – 18″ x 18″ of Central Park Vendor to a buyer from Crofton, MD.

http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/central-park-vendor-edward-fielding.html

Abstact Painting
Abstract Painting by Edward M. Fielding

22.500″ x 30.000″ print of Phantom Lik to a buyer from Des Peres, MO.  http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/phantom-lik-edward-fielding.html

  • Image Size: 22.500″ x 30.000″
  • Total Size: 28.25″ x 35.75″
  • Print Material: Luster Photo Paper
  • Frame: CRQ13 – Black Wood (CRQ13)
  • Top Mat: Arctic White
  • Finishing: 1/8″ Clear Acrylic – Foam Core Mounting
winning isn't everything
Winning isn’t everything

20.000″ x 30.000″ print of Vince Lombardi On Winning to a buyer from Minneapolis, MN. http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/vince-lombardi-on-winning-edward-fielding.html

  • Image Size: 20.000″ x 30.000″
  • Total Size: 25.75″ x 35.75″
  • Print Material: Luster Photo Paper
  • Frame: CRQ13 – Black Wood (CRQ13)
  • Top Mat: Arctic White
  • Finishing: 1/8″ Clear Acrylic – Foam Core Mounting
Vintage Walgreen Drugs Store Neon Sign
Vintage Walgreen Drugs Store Neon Sign

Vintage Walgreen Drugs Store Neon Sign – 5.250″ x 8.000″ print of Vintage Walgreen Drugs Store Neon Sign to a buyer from Boca Raton, FL http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/vintage-walgreen-drugs-store-neon-sign-edward-fielding.html

Stop and smell the roses
9.000″ x 12.000″ print of Stop And Smell The Flowers to a buyer from El Dorado, AR.

9.000″ x 12.000″ print of Stop And Smell The Flowers to a buyer from El Dorado, AR.  http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/stop-and-smell-the-flowers-edward-fielding.html

 Lou's Of Hanover New Hampshire to a buyer from Rosemount, MN.
Lou’s Of Hanover New Hampshire to a buyer from Rosemount, MN.

14.000″ x 10.500″ print of Lou’s Of Hanover New Hampshire to a buyer from Rosemount, MN. http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/lous-of-hanover-new-hampshire-edward-fielding.html

 Mugs Sold This Week

Pink Sassy Mug
Pink Sassy Mug

Coffee Mug – Small (11 oz.) of Sassy Tee to a buyer from London, – United Kingdom. http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/sassy-tee-edward-fielding.html

Coffee Mug - Small (11 oz.) of Peace Hippy Paint Hand Sign to a buyer from London, - United Kingdom.
Coffee Mug – Small (11 oz.) of Peace Hippy Paint Hand Sign to a buyer from London, – United Kingdom.

Peace Hippy – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/peace-hippy-paint-hand-sign-edward-fielding.html

8.000" x 7.375" print of This Is How I Roll Tee to a buyer from Lincoln, Lincs - United Kingdom.
8.000″ x 7.375″ print of This Is How I Roll Tee to a buyer from Lincoln, Lincs – United Kingdom.

This is how I roll vintage tractor print http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/this-is-how-i-roll-tee-edward-fielding.html

Sold on Society6 – https://society6.com/edwardmfielding

12/08/2016
Sunrise on Hoth Art Print / SMALL 19″ x 13″
Pending 1
12/05/2016
Historic Louisburg Square Beacon Hill Boston Art Print / LARGE 28″ x 2…
Pending 1
12/02/2016
Take those old records off the shelf Carry-All Pouch / Small (6″ x 5″)
Pending 1
12/01/2016
Triumph GT Pop Art Art Print / MINI 8″ x 8″
Pending 1
11/26/2016
Caddy Fins Duvet Cover / Queen: 88″ x 88″
Pending 1
11/26/2016
Old Ford Pickup Truck iPhone & iPod Case / iPhone 6 Plus / Tough Case
Pending 1
11/21/2016
Alien Abduction Art Print / MINI 8″ x 10″
Pending 1
11/20/2016
Model T Ford Framed Art Print / Vector White / MEDIUM (Gallery) 20″ x …
Pending 1
11/20/2016
Old Ford Pickup Truck Framed Art Print / Vector Black / MEDIUM (Galler…
Pending 1
11/20/2016
Vintage Sunflower Shower Curtain / 71″ by 74″
Pending 1
11/20/2016
French Paris Writing Ink Nibs Notebook / 6″ x 8″ Lined
Pending 1
11/19/2016
Take those old records off the shelf Carry-All Pouch / Small (6″ x 5″)
Pending 1
11/17/2016
Silver Liquor Flask Stationery Cards / Set of 3 Folded Cards (5″ x 7″)
Pending 1
11/17/2016
VW Bus Blue Throw Pillow / Indoor / Cover (20″ x 20″)
Pending 1

 

Sell The Gallery Not The Gift Shop

Sell the Gallery

As a successful seller on Fine Art America and Pixels, I’m often asked for advice from other artists trying to get an online business off the ground.

Sell Art Online

Art is Business

First of all the key word is “business”.   My career in the arts started about 35 years ago when I first fell in love with photography at a summer camp.  We shot film and developed it in a dark bag on a picnic table.  Later in high school I got my first SLR and darkroom experience.  Practicality took me to Boston Universities business school but I still shot film and developed prints in my closet darkroom as I studied the great photographers in BUs extensive library of photography books.

So I ended up with a business degree and a career in the publishing industry.  Later when I left the publishing world to dedicate my time to my fine art career, I brought the knowledge of the business world and market research world with me.  After all – Art is Business.

Sell Art Online

As an artist, one can not pretend that art is all about self-expression, freedom and ignorant bliss.  You have to recognize that art is a marketplace like any other.  There are needs that need to be fulfilled.  There are buyers and sellers.  There is an exchange of money for a product.  The artist is in a sense a factory that produces a product just like any other product and the collector is a buyer of that product.  If you produce items that have no market, you won’t be successful.

And you have to consider the over all market size for your art/product.  It could be that there are thousands of people out their clamoring for your specific type of artwork.  Or there might only be one person in the world who wants exactly what you have to offer.

Photography Prints

Price accordingly.  If the there are thousands of people looking for your art than you can sell them items with low mark up.  Maybe mugs are the way to go.  Maybe there are thousands of people looking for your art on a mug so you can make $1 on each one and net $1,000 for your effort and you can sell out in a day.

Or maybe there is only one elusive person on the planet who “gets” your work.  Now to find this person will take considerable time and effort.  You will have to spend a lot of money (in the form of time and maybe advertising) to find this buyer.  You will need to cut through all of the clutter and grab their attention at the right time.  Hopefully not just after they’ve spent all of their money on a different artist.

Late Model Car Metal Print
Late Model Car Metal Print

So after years of searching for this buyer and after convincing them that your work is worthy of their attention and money, what are you going to sell them? A coffee mug?

Sell The Gallery Not The Gift Shop

I see a lot of my fellow artists on Fine Art America clamoring for the site to sell things like calendars or coaster or some other low end product.  I think it comes about for a few reasons:

  1.  They aren’t currently selling the products offered at the moment
  2. They always dreamed about seeing their art on X,Y,Z
  3. They think the addition of another product might be just the thing for their art to start selling

Photography Prints

My strategy has always been to take the high road.  Low end products can be there, in the gift shop so to speak, but my main goal is to sell prints.

I work with the idea that my work is going to hang on someone’s wall.  This is how I approach my work.  This is what motivates me to get up in the morning on a cold snowy day and hike out to an old red barn in rural Vermont to capture a winter landscape.

This is why I spend thousands of dollars on travel expenses and equipment and put in the hours of processing time. I’m doing this work to create art prints which have a decent profit built in to pay for my time and effort.

I’m not doing this to sell a greeting card, mug or beach towel.  If those gift shop items happen to sell then so be it but that is not my focus.  This is what I mean buy selling the gallery not the gift shop.

You sell the movie not the popcorn.  Sell the main event not the side card.  Sell the candidate not the red trucker hats. Sell the car not the fuzzy dice.

I license my work to greeting card companies, book publishers, magazine editors etc.  This is the way to get your work on these products, created in the 10s of thousands.  If your work is up to industry standards then there is a market for it on consumer products.  This is different than self publishing in a vanity site.  If your work is puzzle quality then seek out a puzzle publisher and license your work to them.  They know the market, they know the buyers.  Far too many artist try to reinvent the wheel by going it alone and trying handle every aspect of the various markets, many of them not having any understanding of how that market works.

Sell Art Online

I suggest seeking out the experts in the various sales channels, people who have years experience in that industry.  Concentrate on selling high end products of your work, leave the gift shop items to themselves or the experts in those areas.

When it comes to selling your artwork, concentrate on the high end, not the low end.  Be professional and value your work.

see my portfolio at – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com

The Visual Poetry Series by Edward M. Fielding

Visual Poetry Series by Edward M. Fielding

Introducing the Visual Poetry series of surreal, multi-layered composite photography by Edward M. Fielding full of meaning and intrigue.

If you could photograph your dreams, what would they look like? The Visual Poetry series by Edward M. Fielding uses layered imagery to recreate a dream-like vision with plenty of room for interpretation.

http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/visual+poetry+series

Skull - part of the visual poetry series.
Skull – part of the visual poetry series. 

http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/untitled-skull-edward-fielding.html

The Voyage by Edward M. Fielding
The Voyage by Edward M. Fielding – part of the visual poetry series.

http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/the-voyage-edward-fielding.html

Kansas by Edward M. Fielding
Kansas by Edward M. Fielding

http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/kansas-edward-fielding.html

"Fiction" by Edward M. Fielding
“Fiction” by Edward M. Fielding

http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/featured/fiction-edward-fielding.html

See the entire series – http://edward-fielding.pixels.com/collections/visual+poetry+series

About The Series

Edward M. Fielding talks about the Visual Poetry Series:

“This series represents a stream of consciousness.  A playful exploration of imaginary and a non-linear thought process.  A signal final image in the series can begin hours before with browsing through my collection of over 100,000 photographs as well as historical and archived images from the past.

An image can head off on many tangents before the final composite is achieved.  Each image is carefully blended and layered in Adobe Photoshop with textures applied as well as drop shadows giving many of the images in the series a 3D look or depth.

I usually don’t know where the image is headed when I begin and the results are as surprising to me as perhaps the viewer.  Almost like a walking dream, I allow the story to unfold without too many conscious “rules” being applied or too much over thinking that would get in the way of the image coming to life from seemingly random thought.  I often think that this might be the way dreams are constructed in our sleeping heads – random images from the days activities, organized into some sort of storyline.”  –  Edward M. Fielding – www.edwardfielding.com

This fine art photography series is pure “sandbox” playing except with the use of images rather than toy trucks, shovels and pails.  The images lead from one to another until the artist says “stop” – its done.