10 Classic Neon Sign Photographs


Ten Classic Neon Sign Photographs from around the United States by fine art photographer Edward M. Fielding

Fielding’s neon sign series comes from a love of the nostalgic as well as a deep desire to preserve a bit of our commercial history that is being erased by the gentrification of the modern landscape.

“Town and cities used to have a unique style, mood and feeling. Now when you get off the plane, often one feels like they are back where they started. I guess a lot of my work yearns to find remnants of the world that Walker Evans saw.”–Edward M. Fielding

The expanding series includes neon signs from Middletown, Connecticut, Las Vegas, Nevada, Livingston, Montana, Maui, Hawaii and upstate New York among other locations. You can explore more of Edward M. Fielding’s photographs and artwork at www.edwardfielding.com.

Photography Prints

Red Lodge Cafe, Red Lodge, Montana  by Edward M. Fielding

Art Prints

Diner Neon Clock, Quechee, Vermont by Edward M. Fielding

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Trio of Classic Neon Signs, Las Vegas and Six Flags, MA by Edward M. Fielding

Photography Prints

 

Cafe Theater Sign, Livingston, MT by Edward M. Fielding

Photography Prints

 

Church Neon Sign, Maui, Hawaii by Edward M. Fielding

 

Photography Prints

 

Duff Beer Neon Sign, Orlando, FL by Edward M. Fielding

Art Prints

 

Fast Food Hamburgers Neon Sign, West Yellowstone, MT by Edward M. Fielding

 

Photography Prints

 

Empire Theater, Livingston, MT by Edward M. Fielding

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O’Rourke’s Diner, Middletown, CT by Edward M. Fielding

Photography Prints

 

Circle Court Motel, upstate New York by Edward M. Fielding

 

From Wikipedia: In the signage industry, neon signs are electric signs lighted by long luminous gas-discharge tubes that contain rarefied neon or other gases. They are the most common use for neon lighting, which was first demonstrated in a modern form in December 1910 by Georges Claude at the Paris Motor Show. While they are used worldwide, neon signs were extremely popular in the United States from about 1920–1960. The installations in Times Square were famed, and there were nearly 2000 small shops producing neon signs by 1940. In addition to signage, neon lighting is now used frequently by artists and architects, and (in a modified form) in plasma display panels and televisions. The signage industry has declined in the past several decades, and cities are now concerned with preserving and restoring their antique neon signs.